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10 Canadian Olympic Team athletes DO MORE in London with 7SYSTEMS

7SYSTEMS, the endurance sports supplementchosen by Olympians and recreational athletes all over Canada, is pleased to announce 10 of their athletes will be participating in the 2012 Olympic Games. These athletes are not paid for their endorsement of 7SYTEMS but have been chosen by the company.

“7SYSTEMS is extremely proud to be supporting 10 athletes on their way to the 2012 London Olympic Games,’ said Jasper Blake, founder of 7SYSTEMS and Ironman Champion. “Created by world-class athletes, for world-class athletes, 7SYSTEMS was developed to ensure athletes’ nutritional requirements are being met during training and recovery.  Never has that been as important as the lead-up to the 2012 Olympic Games.”

The 2012 7SYSTEMS Team:

  1. Gillian Carleton, first-time Olympian, Track Cycling
  2. Reid Coolsaet, first-time Olympian, Marathon
  3. Paula Findlay, first-time Olympian, Triathlon
  4. Eric Gillis, first-time Olympian, Marathon
  5. Malcolm Howard, gold medallist (2008), Rowing
  6. Kyle Jones, first-time Olympian, Triathlon
  7. Max Plaxton, first-time Olympian, Mountain Biking
  8. Adam Van Koeverden, gold, silver, bronze medallist (2004, 2008, 2004) Kayaking
  9. Simon Whitfield, gold and silver medallist (2000, 2008), Triathlon
  10. Dylan Wykes, first-time Olympian, Marathon

For athlete updates, information on their training and research notes please friend us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/#!/DoMoreWith7systems


2012 PRO TEAM

NEWS RELEASE 

We’re not saying it’s because of 7SYSTEMS, we’re just saying…

Three 7SYSTEMS athletes named to Canadian Olympic Team

April 26th, 2012, TORONTO, ON: The team at 7SYSTEMS congratulates the Canadian Olympic Marathon team announced today at Alumni Stadium, University of Guelph.

Reid Coolsaet, Eric Gillis and most recently Dylan Wykes have all met the qualifying standard for London 2012, and they are all 7SYSTEMS athletes! Wykes and Gillis are relatively new additions to the 7SYSTEMS team and we are so happy we were able to support them on the Road to London. Canada will be well represented at this year’s marathon and we are proud to be providing the supplement needs of all three marathoners.

The Canadians presence in London will mark the first time Canada has had three entries in the Olympic marathon since Peter Fonseca, Carey Nelson and Bruce Deacon ran the marathon for Canada in the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games.

 “We’re very excited about the number of 7SYSTEMS athletes that will be competing at the upcoming games. London 2012 is going to be a great event for Canada and for many of our athletes,” said Jasper Blake, 7SYSTEMS founder and Pro Ironman™ Triathlete. “We work with many of the top-ranked athletes in the country to ensure their nutritional requirements are being met. And, considering we don’t pay our athletes to endorse us, we must be doing a good job! All of our athletes consider 7SYSTEMS an important part of their training regimen and we’re just happy to do our part for this Olympic year and many more to come!”

Reid Coolsaet, from Hamilton, and Eric Gillis, from Guelph, qualified for the Games at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon in October, 2011. Dylan Wykes, from Kingston, ran a 2:10:47 in Rotterdam, Netherlands last week.

These three 7SYSTEMS athletes are the first of certainly many more to be named to the Canadian Olympic Team. Simon Whitfield, Paula Findlay and Malcolm Howard have all met the Canadian Olympic standard in their sports. As well, Adam Van Koueverden and Lauren Groves are still racing for a spot on the London 2012 team.

For a full list of the 7SYSTEMS athletes that have met the Canadian Olympic standard, and for athlete updates, information on their training and research notes please visit: www.7SYSTEMS.ca

About 7SYSTEMS

 7SYSTEMS endurance sport supplement contains over 60 key ingredients to help athletes recover faster and stay healthy. Developed by athletes for athletes, 7SYSTEMS contributes to basic body health and supports the body’s critical systems. 7SYSTEMS is more complete, more capable and available in more convenient daily supplement pouches. 

Tested by high performance athletes, 7SYSTEMS endurance sport supplement is being credited by many athletes as a factor in their success.  7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement is manufactured by Douglas Laboratories, a well known and respected company that meets or exceeds Health Canada’s Good Manufacturing Practices in its operations and is one of only a few ISO certified nutritional supplement manufacturers in North America. Douglas Labs does not handle any of the raw compounds on the WADA banned substance list.

 In a comparative study, 7SYSTEMS manufacturer ranked 9.4 on a 10 point effectiveness scale, one of only a few supplements that scored over the 8.0 ‘excellent’ rating. The effectiveness score considers factors like: potency, bio-availability, potency, composition and synergistic effect. Most store bought ‘sport’ brands scored 4.0 or less.

For more information and research notes please visit: www.7SYSTEMS.ca

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For More Information:

Stacie Smith, Smith Communications, Stacie@smithcommunications.ca, (416) 910-8112

 

 


Simple Salmon

From Jasper Blake

Ingredients:

  • Salmon fillet
  • Lemon
  • Season salt
  • Tinfoil

Directions

  1. Wrap a filet in tinfoil with a couple slices of lemon and some season salt
  2. Cook on the BBQ on medium heat for 20 minutes
  3. Check inside wrap occasionally to make sure juices have not dried up
  4. Fish is ready when strips flake away with gentle nudge by fork
  5. Serve with basmati rice or quinoa


2011 PRO TEAM

Based on the unprecedented success of the 2010 7SYSTEMS team, the entire team is returning to compete again in 2011.  As well, there are three new additions to the team that are remarkable individuals committed to DOING MORE and doing it better.

NEW 2011 TEAM MEMBERS

Plus Paula Findlay: Paula Findlay is young triathlete with an impressive list of accomplishments. This year alone she has won three World championship series races consecutively, one each in Sydney, Kitzbuhel and Madrid and took a third at the Mooloolaba World Cup.  Read more about Paula.

Annamay Pierse: Annamay is a member of Canada’s national swim team and the current world record holder for the women’s 200m breaststroke.  Annamay was a member of the 2008 Canadian Olympic team in Beijing and is currently preparing for London in 2012.

Max Plaxton: Perhaps one of  Canada’s top male mountain biker and is a London 2012 hopeful.  Max is a professional mountain biker, five-time National Champion and two-time World Champion in the relay event. He currently is one of four team members in USA factory team Specialized/Sho-air which is a professional cross-country mountain bike team.  This year he has won the Canadian National Championships and is the US Pro Cross-Country Tour overall champion with 3 wins. Read his full profile.

Reid Coolsaet: He’s been running cross-country ever since the sixth grade and hasn’t missed a single season.
Reid is a 7-time 5000m Canadian Champion and also credits the 10 000m,  marathon and cross-country running titles to his name.  He has participated at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, 4 IAAF World Cross Country Championships and 2 World Track & Field Championships.   Coolsaet just ran 2:11:23, the fastest time ever run by a Canadian on Canadian soil, at the 2010 Scotiabank Toronto Marathon. This time is 6 seconds faster than the Canadian Olympic marathon standard.

RETURNING ATHLETES FROM 2010

Jasper Blake www.jasper.is: Professional Triathlete, Ironman Champion

Mike Neill www.mikeneill.com: Professional Triathlete, Owner/Head coach Human Powered Racing

Simon Whitfield www.simonwhitfield.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist Triathlete

Adam Van Koueverden www.vankayak.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist, World Champion Kayaker

Lauren Groves-Campbell Lauren Groves blogspot: 2008 Beijing Olympian Triathlete

Adam Campbell Adam Campbell Blogspot: Top Canadian Runner

Ray Zahab www.rayzahab.com: Ultra distance running legend

Malcolm Howard http://malcolmhoward.ca/: World champion, Olympic Champion Rower

Kyle Jones www.kylejones.ca: Canadian Short Course Triathlon Team

Erinne Willock Profile for Erinne Willock: Professional Road Cyclist, 2008 Beijing Olympian

Megan Brown Profile of Megan Brown: Top Canadian Runner

7SYSTEMS works with individuals not only as company ambassadors but as athletes who are committed to using the product and sharing the benefits with others. Last year there were hundreds of applicants and the team was picked on the basis of podium finishes, amazing athletic feats and strength of character.


Top 7 Marathon Tips- by Jasper Blake

1- Warm up

Warming up for any event is crucial but not all warm ups are created equally.  It’s important to have several different warm strategies in place.  There are numerous factors that affect what type of warm up to do.  For example warming up for an endurance event when it’s incredibly hot requires some tempering.  There is no sense spending an hour depleting your body of water and electrolytes before the race even starts.  You still need to get your muscles and heart ready to do work but you need to factor in the cost.  For marathons a similar problem occurs.  How much time can you really spend warming up when the race itself is going to take 2.5-6+ hours depending on who you are.  Typically the shorter the race the more warm up is required and conversely the longer the race the less warm up is required.  This is in part due to the pace you are going to go (shorter is much faster) and in part due to the actual energy loss you can afford to give up.  For marathons you shouldn’t need more than about ten minutes of light jogging and some strides to really get warmed up.  Of course if you are an elite runner and aiming for a time in the low two hour mark you will likely need to get your lactic buffers fired up but if you are in the 4 hour plus crowd the first few miles will do just fine.

2- What to wear

Obviously weather is a huge component of longer races.  You cannot get away with something that is too hot or two cold when you have 3+ hours ahead of you.  It’s important to know what the conditions will be like and dress appropriately.  As a general rule you are likely to feel warmer when you are racing than when you are training probably in part due to the intensity.  Probably the number one rule when considering longer events is to make sure that you are comfortable above all else.  Wear what you feel good wearing and that includes your footwear.  Never make drastic changes on race day unless you have tried them in training and know you will be comfortable. 

3- Blisters and Chaffing

It’s rare that we ever run a marathon in training when preparing for a marathon.  It’s important to know that chaffing and blisters can happen when the length of time increases.  You may not experience either of these things in training simply because you may not have run for that long before.  It’s better to prepare for these two things and avoid them all together. 

Blisters are obviously most common on the feet.  There are several strategies that can help you avoid blisters.  Double layer socks are a great idea.  A company called “wright sock” make very lightweight, thin socks that are perfect in any shoe.  The basic idea is that the layers of sock rub against each other opposed to your skin rubbing against the sock.  There are several great products out there in cream or powder form that can also help stave off blisters that are easily massaged into the feet or put into the shoes.  

Chaffing is a different story.  Chaffing can happen in some of the most unexpected places and it’s a good idea to prepare accordingly.  Some common places for chaffing are inner thighs, underarms and nipples.  Combine the constant rub of clothing or skin on skin mixed with a bit of moisture and salt and it can be a painful experience.  Chaffing can be avoided with the right clothing and of course some anti-friction cream.  I’ve even seen people put band-aids on their nipples, which is as effective as it is interesting.

4- Pacing

Pacing is probably the most important aspect in a marathon.  You must have a plan when it comes to pacing or chances are that you will go out too fast.  The longer the event the less chance you have to do anything different than you have been doing in training.  By the time the marathon rolls around you should be well versed in your pace and should stick too it.  There is a tendency in races to feel very good particularly in the beginning and this can lead people out of their appropriate pace very quickly.  Inevitably it will come back to haunt you in the later stages if you go too far beyond your capacity.  At larger marathons it’s common to have “pace bunnies”, people who are designated to hit a certain pace so you can run and pace off of them.  Regardless, most races are usually marked in miles or kilometers and all you need is a stopwatch to figure it out.  Stay on pace and you have a greater chance of reaching your goals.

5- Mental Resiliance

One of the best mental strategies you can have for a marathon is to break it into pieces.  The thought of 26 miles or 42km can be daunting.  However most people are comfortable with one mile.  So instead of running 26 miles run one mile, then another, then another and so on.  It’s also a good idea to be familiar with the course.  Often a route seems longer when we first do it but as you do it more and more it gets smaller in your head.  The brain likes familiarity and if the route has been studied it’s easier for the brain to manage.

6- Nutrition and Hydration

The longer the event the more important nutrition becomes.  Anything up to an hour and nutrition is almost a mute point.  The body typically has enough glycogen stores to last 60-90 minutes but beyond that it needs a steady stream of carbohydrate to keep going.  Anyone who has bonked knows what it feels like to have depleted glycogen stores.  It doesn’t matter how fit you are, if you run out of glycogen it will seriously affect your day.  It’s important to have a plan that you have tried in practice.  It’s also important to know what they have on the course and know that you can handle consuming what they provide.  Typically aid stations are every 1-3 miles so it’s also valuable to know the timeframe with which you will have access to nutrition.  If you are on the slower side it might be a good idea to bring your own.  The best strategy is to take little amounts frequently so as never to dump too much sugar into your gut at once.  As intensity goes your ability to absorb calories decreases and vice versa.

Hydration is a major factor in longer events.  Water loss happens from the blood stream, which makes the blood thicker and harder for your heart to move.  This causes an increase in your effort level.  Water loss also decreases ones ability to cool down.  We sweat so that our body can regulate its core temperature.  Sweat on the skin has a cooling effect.  If we lose too much water we decrease our bodies ability to cool down which increases core body temperature and increases perceived effort.  Hydrating during long events needs to happen at regular intervals.  Like caloric intake, we can only absorb so much water at one time.  Dumping too much fluid into the gut at once is a recipe for disaster.  Sodium loss and intake also becomes an important factor when we consider hydration.  Most sports drinks have sodium for a reason.  Sweat contains salt and the more we lose the harder it is for us to move water from the gut to the blood stream.  Bloating is one of the major side effects of sodium depletion.  When the blood is low in sodium the osmotic gradient required to move fluid across membranes no longer exists and water sits in the gut.  You can have great quantities of fluid in your gut but if it’s not in your blood stream you can still be severely dehydrated.

7- Recovery

The marathon is probably one of the hardest events to fully recover from.  It’s easy to ride your bike or swim for several hours but the repeated pounding that happens when we run really takes a toll on the body.  There is a reason why people rarely actually run a marathon in training prior to the actual event, it just takes too long to recover from.  Studies have shown that even 3-4 weeks post marathon there can be micro-tears in the muscle indicating that they are still not recovered. 

There are several strategies you can use to recover quicker from a marathon. 

  • Stick to low or no impact sports for at least two weeks
  • Limit the time on your feet to walking for a couple of weeks
  • If you must run try water running- a low impact alternative
  • Focus on great nutrition and lean protein to help muscles rebuild
  • Contrast as in hot/cold treatment work wonders
  • Massage or any physical contact that promotes blood flow to muscle groups is a very good idea
  • Replace sodium and fluid that has been lost
  • Sleep- nothing is as restorative as sleep


Mike Bosch

Five years ago, 37 year-old Mike Bosch was nearing 240lbs and decided it was time to turn his health around.  Fast forward five years and Mike is now 148lbs and entering his 5th year of running.  Each year since 2005 Mike has logged more miles and gotten faster, setting new PBs over every distance he chooses to compete at.  In 2009 Mike ran 3:08:46 at the Buffalo marathon in the spring and then 2:56:09 in the fall at Good Life Toronto.  This spring he lowered his marathon PB to 2:48:30 at Mississauga, finishing 12th overall and 3rd master.   

Mike has worked hard during those 5 years, putting in an increasing number miles and some tough speed work sessions as he gained fitness in a well planned progressive program under the watchful eye of a coach.  Mike’s goal is to crack 2:40 in the marathon and is focused on doing everything he can to reach that goal.  Mike knows it is hard to push his body to its limits if you don’t treat it well, so he tries to sleep as much as possible and maximize downtime to ensure his body gets enough recovery.  Mike also pays close attention to his nutrition with the help of 7SYSTEMS.  Prior to using 7SYSTEMS, Mike would always come down with a cold right when his training program would hit the heaviest point but since starting on the product in the spring of 2009 he has not been sick once even though his training program keeps getting harder and longer.


Overview of Supplement Manufacturing

Where do those little pills come from, anyway?

Written by: Jonathan Toker, Ph.D., developer of SaltStick product

Consumers generally take for granted that the contents inside a bottle of supplement X matches exactly the label on the outside. Fortunately and for the most part, thanks to the rules currently in place, this is true. However, there are multiple opportunities during production where the contents of the bottle may no longer be represented correctly by the label. Somewhat analogous to bicycle frame builders, most brands of nutritional supplements are manufactured in a limited number of facilities, or contract labs. It’s not economically feasible for a small company with a product line of nutritional supplements to have its own production facility.

Contract labs specialize in production of supplements, analytical testing, and packaging. These labs can be either cGMP or non-cGMP compliant at this time, and the resulting product could be affected by the way the company treats each batch of product being produced. Until 2010, supplements can be legally produced in non-cGMP facilities. The actual contract lab used by any given supplement company is usually a guarded secret as part of one’s competitive advantage. Therefore, rather than looking to the name on the bottle, one must look at the actual contract lab as the source of the product, and the inherent production risks.

From start to finish at a contract lab

a) Starting Materials

Most contract labs source their raw materials from a wide range of outside suppliers, many of whom specialize in certain classes of materials, such as amino acids, protein powders, minerals, etc. Each supplier provides to the contract lab a certificate of analysis (COA) that is issued for each and every lot (batch) of raw material. Suppliers can be located overseas or domestically with the actual starting material produced anywhere around the world.

When raw materials are received by a contract lab, they should be positively identified. This is usually done easily and quickly by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. By matching a characteristic fingerprint spectrum of the raw material with a reference spectrum for the material, identity can be confirmed. Purity (the percent active content of the material) is not usually assayed at this time, depending on the COA of the material for this and any other details. This is the first intersection where impurities that originated in the starting material factory or packaging would enter the contract lab undetected. Note that the NIR identity confirmation is not sensitive to pick up foreign matter in the raw material and is a bulk test only. 

An entirely different set of concerns arises with herbal ingredients. Many materials such as St. John’s wort, royal jelly, ginkgo biloba, yucca root, grape seed extract, and many others originate from plant extracts. Currently, there are few standards in place to qualify these raw materials for potency or purity. This means that a bottle containing 100 percent St. John’s wort may actually have 5 percent active while another labeled the same way may have double or triple that amount. The FDA final rule guidance on these materials is still 100 percent identification testing, which is problematic due to current analytical testing limitations of some of these materials. At this time, manufacturers can apply for an exemption to this testing. It is hoped within the herbal industry that further clarity on this situation will arise before the FDA final rule takes effect.

As a result of these regulations, products containing herbal ingredients are generally non-standardized and consumers need to be especially aware of potential issues with these products. As a visual rule-of-thumb, if the “Supplement Facts” panel indicates “Daily value not established” for a given ingredient, it is likely that less than adequate information is known about that particular ingredient. Not only are herbal ingredients of often unreliable content, but their toxicity and benefits have generally not been tested in clinical settings, which further prompts the warning: buyer beware.

b) Processing of ingredients

Once the raw materials are identified upon receipt, the contract lab prepares the formulation according to specifications required by the supplement company. This can include dry mixing, wet mixing, granulation, and other physical handling steps. Containers used for these processes are part of machines that can be manually or automatically operated. Often made of stainless steel parts, these complex mixing bowls are used for a given batch and then cleaned and readied for the next product, one that may be totally distinct from the batch before and after it. cGMP contract labs will follow a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that dictate how the machine is to be cleaned, rinsed, and dried. Some facilities conduct a “cleaning verification” whereby some of the rinse wash is tested for the active ingredient from the previous batch. Possible source of contamination #2 arises if a machine is incompletely or incorrectly cleaned leading to carryover from one product to another. In this way, for example, a steroid material from one product batch could be carried over to a protein supplement in the next batch of processed product.

c) Encapsulation/bottling/packaging of the product

The final step within the contract lab takes the mixed product into its final form for the consumer. This can include bulk powder in plastic tubs, pressing powder into pills, or filling capsules with powder. Once again, industry-specific machines are used for this step. Careful cleaning between batches of different product is critical to ensuring no cross-contamination between products. Once the product is in its final packaging, a quality control (QC) unit serves to qualify and inspect the final product. Once again following SOPs, the QC analyst inspects the product against specifications that can include fill weight, color, particle size and other physical characteristics.

Testing of the final product for quantitative content of active material is currently not required, but is coming into place with the new regulations by 2010. What this means is that upon QC approval and issuance of a batch-specific certificate of analysis (COA), the product is ready to be released to consumers. What is not positively known at that time is: Was production and mixing even and complete across the batch? Are there any foreign contaminants in the mixture? And most importantly, do the contents of that bottle match the writing on the label? Fortunately, the FDA final rule of June 22, 2007, requires manufacturers to address these questions. For contract labs already following cGMPs, implementation of these rules should be fairly straightforward, although costs to producers are likely to increase due to additional analytical work required. Expect non-cGMP contract labs to get in gear with the rules or face the prospect of shutting down in the coming years.

WADA and the difference between illegal and prohibited substances

At this juncture, it is worth defining the difference between an illegal substance and a prohibited substance. We are all familiar with materials that are regulated by the government that can include cocaine and other opiates, prescription products such as antibiotics, anti-seizure, antidepressants, etc., that are regulated as suitable for certain applications only, under the administration or prescription of a physician. Some of these materials are illegal under any circumstances while others can be used as needed by those to whom permission is granted (usually by a doctor’s prescription).

WADA has defined a list of substances for which their consumption has deemed to be “against the rules” of sport. Athletes who fall within a sport governed by WADA rules are responsible for observing the WADA prohibited substance list. To be clear: WADA-prohibited substances are not necessarily illegal from a regulated standpoint, but are listed because they can provide an athlete with an unfair advantage in sport. The consequence is that some WADA-prohibited substances can legally be produced in the same contract lab as other nutritional supplements. Looking back to the production discussed earlier, one can quickly determine how cross contamination between products can present an otherwise compliant athlete with a tainted product.

Does natural equal safe?

 Health food companies and pundits for healthy living often cite that something is “natural”, implying that this automatically equates to “good” or “safe.” It is worth noting here that the most toxic substances in the world are natural (botulism toxin, and other plant and animal toxins such as from the puffer fish and poison dart frog). In the context of nutritional supplements, your body does not know the difference between purified calcium carbonate from the White Cliffs of Dover and purified chalk produced in a laboratory. While allowing for certain unique natural preparations available only in nature, at a chemical level, there is no difference between a substance in “nature” vs. the “lab.” CaCO3 is CaCO3 wherever you find it. With the above under consideration, it is worth keeping an open mind on both synthetic and natural ingredients, and selecting one over the other as needed and on a scientific basis alone.

Who cares?

With the vast majority of athletes competing at the amateur level, one must ask if it matters if a little bit of X gets in my supplement? Focusing specifically on triathlon, age group athletes are not tested currently at any race except the annual ITU World Championship. Therefore the vast majority of triathletes will never see a drug test. Are they willing to pay a little bit more for a supplement that had been prepared in a cGMP contract lab and tested for WADA prohibited substances? The professionals are tested much more frequently and races worldwide. National governing bodies (NGB) such as USA Triathlon inform their athletes that they must comply with the WADA prohibited substance list, informing athletes that it is their own responsibility to do so. However, other than conducting their own testing or avoiding all nutritional supplements altogether, there is no way that a dedicated professional athlete can ensure that neither the food that they eat nor the supplements they consume are clean. Until now…


2010 PRO TEAM

7SYSTEMS, the endurance sport supplement chosen by Olympians and recreational athletes all over Canada, has named ten athletes to their 2010 PRO TEAM. The team was chosen from among Canada’s top athletes. With hundreds of applicants, the team was picked on the basis of podium finishes, amazing athletic feats and strength of character.

 READ THE FULL PRESS RELEASE.

MORE ABOUT THE ATHLETES
 

  • Jasper Blake: Triathlon – Ironman™
  • Megan Brown: Running – Cross Country / Track and Field
  • Adam Campbell: Running – Marathon
  • Lauren Groves: Triathlon – Olympic Distance
  • Malcolm Howard: Rowing
  • Kyle Jones: Triathlon – Olympic Distance
  • Mike Neill: Triathlon – Ironman™
  • Adam Van Koeverden: Canoe / Kayak
  • Simon Whitfield: Triathlon – Olympic Distance
  • Erinne Willock: Cycling – Road
  • Ray Zahab: Running – Ultra marathons, expeditions
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