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2011 PRO TEAM

Based on the unprecedented success of the 2010 7SYSTEMS team, the entire team is returning to compete again in 2011.  As well, there are three new additions to the team that are remarkable individuals committed to DOING MORE and doing it better.

NEW 2011 TEAM MEMBERS

Plus Paula Findlay: Paula Findlay is young triathlete with an impressive list of accomplishments. This year alone she has won three World championship series races consecutively, one each in Sydney, Kitzbuhel and Madrid and took a third at the Mooloolaba World Cup.  Read more about Paula.

Annamay Pierse: Annamay is a member of Canada’s national swim team and the current world record holder for the women’s 200m breaststroke.  Annamay was a member of the 2008 Canadian Olympic team in Beijing and is currently preparing for London in 2012.

Max Plaxton: Perhaps one of  Canada’s top male mountain biker and is a London 2012 hopeful.  Max is a professional mountain biker, five-time National Champion and two-time World Champion in the relay event. He currently is one of four team members in USA factory team Specialized/Sho-air which is a professional cross-country mountain bike team.  This year he has won the Canadian National Championships and is the US Pro Cross-Country Tour overall champion with 3 wins. Read his full profile.

Reid Coolsaet: He’s been running cross-country ever since the sixth grade and hasn’t missed a single season.
Reid is a 7-time 5000m Canadian Champion and also credits the 10 000m,  marathon and cross-country running titles to his name.  He has participated at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, 4 IAAF World Cross Country Championships and 2 World Track & Field Championships.   Coolsaet just ran 2:11:23, the fastest time ever run by a Canadian on Canadian soil, at the 2010 Scotiabank Toronto Marathon. This time is 6 seconds faster than the Canadian Olympic marathon standard.

RETURNING ATHLETES FROM 2010

Jasper Blake www.jasper.is: Professional Triathlete, Ironman Champion

Mike Neill www.mikeneill.com: Professional Triathlete, Owner/Head coach Human Powered Racing

Simon Whitfield www.simonwhitfield.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist Triathlete

Adam Van Koueverden www.vankayak.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist, World Champion Kayaker

Lauren Groves-Campbell Lauren Groves blogspot: 2008 Beijing Olympian Triathlete

Adam Campbell Adam Campbell Blogspot: Top Canadian Runner

Ray Zahab www.rayzahab.com: Ultra distance running legend

Malcolm Howard http://malcolmhoward.ca/: World champion, Olympic Champion Rower

Kyle Jones www.kylejones.ca: Canadian Short Course Triathlon Team

Erinne Willock Profile for Erinne Willock: Professional Road Cyclist, 2008 Beijing Olympian

Megan Brown Profile of Megan Brown: Top Canadian Runner

7SYSTEMS works with individuals not only as company ambassadors but as athletes who are committed to using the product and sharing the benefits with others. Last year there were hundreds of applicants and the team was picked on the basis of podium finishes, amazing athletic feats and strength of character.


Top 7 Marathon Tips- by Jasper Blake

1- Warm up

Warming up for any event is crucial but not all warm ups are created equally.  It’s important to have several different warm strategies in place.  There are numerous factors that affect what type of warm up to do.  For example warming up for an endurance event when it’s incredibly hot requires some tempering.  There is no sense spending an hour depleting your body of water and electrolytes before the race even starts.  You still need to get your muscles and heart ready to do work but you need to factor in the cost.  For marathons a similar problem occurs.  How much time can you really spend warming up when the race itself is going to take 2.5-6+ hours depending on who you are.  Typically the shorter the race the more warm up is required and conversely the longer the race the less warm up is required.  This is in part due to the pace you are going to go (shorter is much faster) and in part due to the actual energy loss you can afford to give up.  For marathons you shouldn’t need more than about ten minutes of light jogging and some strides to really get warmed up.  Of course if you are an elite runner and aiming for a time in the low two hour mark you will likely need to get your lactic buffers fired up but if you are in the 4 hour plus crowd the first few miles will do just fine.

2- What to wear

Obviously weather is a huge component of longer races.  You cannot get away with something that is too hot or two cold when you have 3+ hours ahead of you.  It’s important to know what the conditions will be like and dress appropriately.  As a general rule you are likely to feel warmer when you are racing than when you are training probably in part due to the intensity.  Probably the number one rule when considering longer events is to make sure that you are comfortable above all else.  Wear what you feel good wearing and that includes your footwear.  Never make drastic changes on race day unless you have tried them in training and know you will be comfortable. 

3- Blisters and Chaffing

It’s rare that we ever run a marathon in training when preparing for a marathon.  It’s important to know that chaffing and blisters can happen when the length of time increases.  You may not experience either of these things in training simply because you may not have run for that long before.  It’s better to prepare for these two things and avoid them all together. 

Blisters are obviously most common on the feet.  There are several strategies that can help you avoid blisters.  Double layer socks are a great idea.  A company called “wright sock” make very lightweight, thin socks that are perfect in any shoe.  The basic idea is that the layers of sock rub against each other opposed to your skin rubbing against the sock.  There are several great products out there in cream or powder form that can also help stave off blisters that are easily massaged into the feet or put into the shoes.  

Chaffing is a different story.  Chaffing can happen in some of the most unexpected places and it’s a good idea to prepare accordingly.  Some common places for chaffing are inner thighs, underarms and nipples.  Combine the constant rub of clothing or skin on skin mixed with a bit of moisture and salt and it can be a painful experience.  Chaffing can be avoided with the right clothing and of course some anti-friction cream.  I’ve even seen people put band-aids on their nipples, which is as effective as it is interesting.

4- Pacing

Pacing is probably the most important aspect in a marathon.  You must have a plan when it comes to pacing or chances are that you will go out too fast.  The longer the event the less chance you have to do anything different than you have been doing in training.  By the time the marathon rolls around you should be well versed in your pace and should stick too it.  There is a tendency in races to feel very good particularly in the beginning and this can lead people out of their appropriate pace very quickly.  Inevitably it will come back to haunt you in the later stages if you go too far beyond your capacity.  At larger marathons it’s common to have “pace bunnies”, people who are designated to hit a certain pace so you can run and pace off of them.  Regardless, most races are usually marked in miles or kilometers and all you need is a stopwatch to figure it out.  Stay on pace and you have a greater chance of reaching your goals.

5- Mental Resiliance

One of the best mental strategies you can have for a marathon is to break it into pieces.  The thought of 26 miles or 42km can be daunting.  However most people are comfortable with one mile.  So instead of running 26 miles run one mile, then another, then another and so on.  It’s also a good idea to be familiar with the course.  Often a route seems longer when we first do it but as you do it more and more it gets smaller in your head.  The brain likes familiarity and if the route has been studied it’s easier for the brain to manage.

6- Nutrition and Hydration

The longer the event the more important nutrition becomes.  Anything up to an hour and nutrition is almost a mute point.  The body typically has enough glycogen stores to last 60-90 minutes but beyond that it needs a steady stream of carbohydrate to keep going.  Anyone who has bonked knows what it feels like to have depleted glycogen stores.  It doesn’t matter how fit you are, if you run out of glycogen it will seriously affect your day.  It’s important to have a plan that you have tried in practice.  It’s also important to know what they have on the course and know that you can handle consuming what they provide.  Typically aid stations are every 1-3 miles so it’s also valuable to know the timeframe with which you will have access to nutrition.  If you are on the slower side it might be a good idea to bring your own.  The best strategy is to take little amounts frequently so as never to dump too much sugar into your gut at once.  As intensity goes your ability to absorb calories decreases and vice versa.

Hydration is a major factor in longer events.  Water loss happens from the blood stream, which makes the blood thicker and harder for your heart to move.  This causes an increase in your effort level.  Water loss also decreases ones ability to cool down.  We sweat so that our body can regulate its core temperature.  Sweat on the skin has a cooling effect.  If we lose too much water we decrease our bodies ability to cool down which increases core body temperature and increases perceived effort.  Hydrating during long events needs to happen at regular intervals.  Like caloric intake, we can only absorb so much water at one time.  Dumping too much fluid into the gut at once is a recipe for disaster.  Sodium loss and intake also becomes an important factor when we consider hydration.  Most sports drinks have sodium for a reason.  Sweat contains salt and the more we lose the harder it is for us to move water from the gut to the blood stream.  Bloating is one of the major side effects of sodium depletion.  When the blood is low in sodium the osmotic gradient required to move fluid across membranes no longer exists and water sits in the gut.  You can have great quantities of fluid in your gut but if it’s not in your blood stream you can still be severely dehydrated.

7- Recovery

The marathon is probably one of the hardest events to fully recover from.  It’s easy to ride your bike or swim for several hours but the repeated pounding that happens when we run really takes a toll on the body.  There is a reason why people rarely actually run a marathon in training prior to the actual event, it just takes too long to recover from.  Studies have shown that even 3-4 weeks post marathon there can be micro-tears in the muscle indicating that they are still not recovered. 

There are several strategies you can use to recover quicker from a marathon. 

  • Stick to low or no impact sports for at least two weeks
  • Limit the time on your feet to walking for a couple of weeks
  • If you must run try water running- a low impact alternative
  • Focus on great nutrition and lean protein to help muscles rebuild
  • Contrast as in hot/cold treatment work wonders
  • Massage or any physical contact that promotes blood flow to muscle groups is a very good idea
  • Replace sodium and fluid that has been lost
  • Sleep- nothing is as restorative as sleep


Ajay Kohli

WINNER

7 Systems Do More Contest from Mark Kennedy on Vimeo.

Target Race: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure 5 km on Sunday, October 3, 2010.

Target Time: 27:00

TARGET RACE REPORT

Ajay finished in a time of 21:19 not only exceeding the 7% improvement target but also shattering his 14% stretch target for an improvement of 27%!

Congratulations to Ajay and the lifestyle transformation he has made.

“Over the past year and a half I have shed over 75 lbs, made healthier lifestyle and dietary choices, as well as improved my race time by 27%. Without a doubt these choices and accomplishments have been fueled by my desire to set and achieve my goals.

Wanting and desiring success is much different than just talking about it, you need to believe in it and then act on those beliefs. Believing in yourself is empowering. It also sets the tone necessary for you to be successful. Equally important, support mechanisms, be it people and or products can significantly accelerate and influence your progress.

With that said, there are many factors that contribute to success. Setting goals, optimizing your experiences and meaningful use of your resources are extremely important. I’m thankful for 7 SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement, to JJ Neely and “Focus In Training” none of my successes would have been possible without their continual support and guidance. Thank you for your products and dedication!”

AUGUST UPDATE

Since starting 7 SYSTEMS I have seen a substantial increase in my training abilities. I have noticed this month that I am able to run, bike and swim harder. I have also noticed an increase in energy levels and weight loss. My training is more consistent and my training gains have increased. With the help of 7SYSTEMS I hope to acheive my goal at the Breast Cancer 5km run.

JULY UPDATE

Throughout the month of July, I believe my training has gone rather well. With the use of 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement I have found that I have the extra energy and endurance I need to complete my training. I have also been able to increase the number of training sessions I can do every week to help accomplish my goal of a 5km run in 27 minutes.

ABOUT AJAY

For the past 38 years I have lived my life with not a care in the world. During those years I engaged in an extremely unhealthy lifestyle that affected my daily life. I would usually smoke a pack of cigarettes a day, drink frequently and use food as a means of escape from every day stress. I started to notice deterioration in my health and a lack of energy. The total impact left me with no motivation to interact with my children at the end of the day. I looked old, felt old, and was almost 50 pounds overweight plus nothing felt right. I was heading down the road to Diabetes, heart condition and possible high blood pressure.  As of last July 2009 I decided to make some changes. I quit smoking cold turkey.  I also stopped drinking.  I started to watch what I ate and have now lost almost 50 pounds.  Most importantly I took up the sport of running. This has given me a whole new outlook on life and a determination to succeed. I have just completed my first Triathlon I and hope to compete in an Iron Man one day.  For my Target Race, I actually believe I can shatter my 5km race time of 29.03 not by 7%, but by 14%!  Failure is not an option.


Adam Campbell- Sub 2:30 marathon runner

adam22“So everyone is looking for the magic formula – how do I get faster and what can I take to improve my performance? The answer to these questions is easy.  Train more and train faster.

However if you are going to buy into that little motto, then you need to make sure that you are recovering between sessions. I think it was the US marathoner and Olympic medalist Deena Kastor who said “there is no such thing as over-training, just under-recovering”. A key element to recovery is through diet. Anyone who tells you otherwise is an idiot. How could diet not affect performance? It is the building block for your cells, muscles, bones, blood…As a hard training athlete, you are also more likely to leach essential nutrients and minerals from your body as you stress the system.

I have always enjoyed pursuing physical challenges, from Ironman racing to running marathons.  My new love and passion is mountain running. When I began training for the Jungfrau marathon, an uphill marathon with over 5000 feet of elevation gain, I knew that I would need improve my ability to recover if I was going to be able to handle the workload and stress of training for such an arduous event. I was fortunate enough to come across 7SYSTEMS at the beginning of my prep for this race and with the help of 7SYSTEMS I was able to complete my biggest run mileage ever, and proceeded to have the best ever finish by a Canadian at a mountain running world championships.

So if you care about your health and you care about your performance 7SYSTEMS is more than worth a shot.”

Adam Campbell is the 2007 Canadian Mountain Running Champion and has a 2:29 marathon personal best.  He is currently at law school studying to become a lawyer.

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Linda Wagar

linda-marathon1“In January 2008, I had an opportunity to try a product that is meant to help endurance athletes.  I have a body type that has a few issues, and I was intrigued by how this supplement was different from others, and how it might be of help to me.  My approach has always been preventative. When I set a goal, I like to achieve it, and feeding my body what it needs, and preventing issues is a fine balance. I had not run long distances in 2 years, and with my plans to run a marathon in May and a 50K endurance run in July, nutrition would have to be a priority in my life. As fate would have it, my diet was not the best in April & May.  My training surprisingly went quite well. I know the supplements helped me not only with stamina but with my recovery.  I was able to go beyond my physical limits, and the realization that there was no residual pain, no inflammation, and very little tightness.  This was my reward: in July I turned 50K into 53K and felt like I had gone for a nice long 6 ½ hour run. I attribute this to taking 7 Systems.

I recommend it for high performance athletes or for runners, like myself, who wish to make nutrition a priority no matter what sport they choose to embrace. My 51 year old body thanked me for taking in 7 Systems and rewarded me with a performance which was beyond my expectations. This former couch potato is happy and I can only imagine what I could do if I was disciplined enough to take them religiously every single day.”

Linda Rainville Wagar
Ottawa, Ontario
linda@lindawagar.com
www.CanadianMarathonStories.ca

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Anthea Seeton

“I have taken the product and I really loved it.  I found out about it on line while preparing for a 30 day Bikram challenge.  All my fellow yogis had all sorts of cramping, stiffness, etc., that thanks to 7SYSTEMS I didn’t suffer from.  I am off to do teacher training in Palm Desert for 9 weeks and decided instead of putting together my own supplement program that I would take the 7 systems.   I don’t take it all the time, but for those times when I am pounding my body it is amazing.”


Jasper Blake- Ironman Champion

jasper-on-bike

“At the heart of it I believe the only way to get better is to train harder and smarter than everyone else and not get injured. To be honest, I usually stay clear of supplements but 7SYSTEMS has created a product that is worth using. Prior to Ironman Canada I incorporated 7SYSTEMS into my nutritional arsenal and it helped me get through one of the toughest training regimens of my career. 7SYSTEMS is a great product. It’s easy to use and takes the guess work out of my nutrition.”

Jasper Blake, Winner, 2006 Ironman Canada

www.jasperblake.com

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Nigel Gray

nigel-gray“I have not been a big believer in supplements over the years. It was always hard to decide what exactly I needed and how much, and with numerous positive doping tests being attributed to uncertified supplements it stopped me from trying to sort it out. 7 Systems has solved all of this. By offering a certified product in which I can be sure of its content, as well as a daily mix of the appropriate vitamins, minerals and anti oxidants, it allows me to train and race with confidence knowing that my body is getting what it needs without any risk of inadvertently ingesting a banned substance.”

Nigel Gray is the head coach, NRG Performance Training.  NRG is a Toronto based multisport team.  Nigel has been part of dozens of personal victories for people over the years.
www.nrgpt.com

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Lucy Smith- 19 Time National Champion

“I can honestly say that energy and recovery is a pretty big deal for me. I do most of my training in the morning and then I am on the go for the rest of the day with no down time. I think that the supplement has really benefited me. There are certainly no negative side effects and I feel that my recovery has been really good and my training and racing has been very strong since starting on the supplement in April ‘07.”

 

Lucy Smith is a 19-Time Canadian Champion and internationally ranked athlete in triathlon, duathlon, and distance running.  She is also the mother of two.


Brad Cunningham – Ultra Marathoner

brad-in-water“The reason we train is to see if we can be better than our former self. In order to be better we need to do things differently than we have done before. For me, that was moving beyond just running all the time. I started to pay attention to the details that affect performance, like diet and recovery. 7SYSTEMS helped me become better.  I found the world of supplements to be confusing and expensive. The 7SYSTEMS team made that world simple for me. Everything I need is in one packet – simple, portable, and smart. Now I’m getting everything my body needs in order to be better than it was before, while saving money at the same time.  What I like about 7SYSTEMS is that it’s designed by athletes. These are people who have done what it is I am trying to do, and they have found a way to simplify the confusing world of supplements.   One packet per day, that’s it! And everything is covered.   The difference between average and good is training.   The difference between good and great is details. 7SYSTEMS has helped me take care of the details.”
Brad Cunningham is an ultra-runner, coach and teacher.


Jordan Rapp- Ironman- Top Triathlon Cyclist

Measuring the efficacy of vitamins is a funny thing. It’s not like caffeine, where the effect is immediate, but short lived. The idea is that you want to slightly raise the overall functioning of your body consistently. Over the past month, I completed two and a half weeks of the most intense training I’ve ever done, in preparation for Ironman Arizona. I started taking 7Systems at the same time. During that time period, I had to occasional “off day,” as we all do, but I felt like I consistently recovered more quickly than I had in the past when taking on this sort of load, and as a result I was able to perform better during my key workout sessions. I believe that 7Systems was a definitive part of that. The convenience of not having to remember to take a variety of supplements was also very helpful; that may seem like a small thing, but simply having one packet that you open and take to get everything you need makes a difference when you have a lot going on.

 

Jordan Rapp is well known for his popular cycling and bike fit advice on the internet chat forum Slowtwitch, and has compiled 5 top 3 overall finishes at Ironman events in the past 3 years.


Mental Preparation- Stefan Timms

Mentally Preparing for the Early Season Races

By Stefan Timms

Some call it the winter coma.  Others call it hibernation.  Whatever term you choose to use, clearing the mental cobwebs that are associated with training through the winter can be difficult.  Early season races allow us the opportunity to do a mental spring-cleaning of sorts.  They allow us the chance to regain our technical race skills (i.e. transitions), to build up some fitness at race intensity, and to set up a successful triathlon season.  It is important be realistic in your approach to the early season and use it for what it is – a tune-up.

Many people emerge from winter having completed a solid aerobic training block.  The base miles they have done have them feeling fit and wanting to test themselves.  This is a great mindset to have, and physically these people are in a great place as well.  Others used the winter for feasting and hanging with the family, and the early season races mean something entirely different for them.  However, no matter where your fitness is at, there are some basic strategies you can use to mentally prepare for the early season races.

* Don’t leave anything to chance on race day.  Make sure that you aware what is required for the race and have it ready the night before the race, if not a few days before (i.e. race gear, registration, race kit pick up).  Reduce the race to just racing.  Remove any unneeded stress from race day so that you are able to focus all your energy on the task at hand.

* Rehearse your race day plan before the race so that when you arrive you are able to go through the motions with little thought.  Eat the same breakfast that you eat, get to the race site the same amount of time before the race, follow the same routine.  This all should have been practiced in the weeks and months leading up to the race so that you feel comfortable going through the whole process.

* Be positive about yourself and your upcoming race.  The words you choose to use and think should be positive so that you are energized about racing.  Take some time in the months and weeks leading into the race to visualize you completing the race the way you want it to occur. Knowing the course is a huge advantage so that you can see it as you race it in your mind.  On race day you will feel as though you have done this before and you will achieve the result you know can achieve.

* Do whatever you need to do put yourself in the mental state you need to be in for the race.  If you require loud music, then wear a Walkman.  If you require solitude, then seek it out prior to the race.  It is your race and you need to do what is best for you to create your own positive race environment.  On race day it is ok to be selfish.  You know what you need, to do what is necessary to get you ready to race.

* Be aware that the unexpected always occurs on race day and be prepared for it.  Have three extras tubes for your bike instead of one.  Have extra food in case you get caught in a line up.  Have water accessible. Think about the possibilities of the uncontrollable, and try to prepare for them.  If something you hadn’t considered occurs, then deal with it, but don’t let it affect your mental state. You control your mindset.

The first race of the year can be a little hectic as we all try to remember the things that made us successful last season.  The most important thing to realize is that we are all rusty.  Nobody comes back from a not racing for a few months and is perfect.  And rarely does the person who wins the first race of the year also win the most important race of the year later that summer.  Early season races need to be approached differently than those that hold more importance.  The success of the race should not be determined by the outcome of the results, but rather based on the achievement of predetermined goals for the race.  Tune up your mental skills, as well your physical ones, and learn about racing.  This will set you up for a successful season.


Tara Norton- Ironman

tara-norton

“As a professional Ironman triathlete, I spend a lot of my racing season traveling to races all over the world.  With the 7SYSTEMS packages, I don’t have to spend so much time gathering all my supplements as the convenient daily packages make it simple.  I started taking 7SYSTEMS before Ironman Austria and not only did I have increased energy for my training, but I achieved a personal best time in my Ironman, and my recovery has been perfect.  Because of the intensity of my training and the sheer number of hours that I train each week, my immune system is compromised.  7SYSTEMS helps to keep my immune system built up and prevents me from getting sick.  I am thrilled to finally find a sports-specific supplement geared towards endurance athletes.”
 
Tara has been one of Canada’s top and most consistent female Ironman athletes over the past 5 years with 10 top 5 overall finishes at Ironman events.  Tara also has an active physiotherapist practice and coaches several age group athletes.

www.taranorton.com

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Peter Oyler

oyler“Training for the RACE ACROSS AMERICA (RAAM) required that I spend an incredible amount of hours on the bike in order to make sure I was super comfortable with my bike. With week after week of high volume training and some intensity, I needed to supplement my vitamin and mineral needs. 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement made a noticeable difference in so many areas for me. It is a great supplement for those who have great nutritional habits and for especially for someone like me who is always on the fly and not a great cook! Our bodies need what 7SYSTEMS provides in order to keep going strong mile after mile.”

Peter Oyler finished 8th overall in the 2007 RACE ACROSS AMERICA.  He has started training for training for the 2009 race again.

www.peteroyler.com

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Mike Greenburg

mike-greenberg“I must admit I was skeptical at first about the product but after about three weeks of using it I started to notice that I had higher energy levels (especially in the morning) and my recovery between workouts had greatly improved. However what really convinced me is when I ran out and was off the product for a couple of weeks. I became much more tired and was not recovering from workouts as well as before.. Now I am back on the product and feel great. I think because I have a hectic work schedule and don’t always eat properly; the product has been an important complement to my training and general well being. To me the ease of use of the product is a big advantage. I would highly recommend this product to anyone.”
Mike Greenberg was 3rd overall at the 2007 National Amateur Triathlon Championships and 1st at the 2008 Championships.  He is also an Investment Banker and soon to be father.


Jonathan Moncreiff

“Having taken several years off from competitive running and triathlons, I found that returning to competition and the fitness level I desired was not as easy or as straightforward as I would have hoped. In short, although the mind was willing, time had taken its toll on my body. While getting through the mandated workouts was possible, recovery did come as quickly as before and as a result it took longer to make the desired progression.  Moreover, whereas I could once focus much of my energy on my fitness pursuits (be it workouts, rest, dietary requirements, etc.), today’s reality is that I have many different and competing interests for my time. Each day only has 24 hours in it and I, much like most people I know, frequently find it difficult to get done (both work and training related) what I would like to before I need to get to bed to be rested enough to face the next day.  Thus, faced with these new challenges, it became evident that if I wanted to meet my lofty fitness goals, I was going to need to be smart about my training. Luckily, it was at about this time that I discovered 7SYSTEMS. Since starting to use 7SYSTEMS, I have noticed both increased energy levels (specifically when I wake up) and that my recovery is accelerated (both crucial elements in my book). The fact that all my supplement needs can be met in one product is also a huge advantage. Gone are the days of having to purchase, organize and carry around multiple individual supplement products. I highly recommend this product.”
Jonathan Moncrieff: Corporate Lawyer; Competitive Runner and Triathlete