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Everybody into the Pool

By Coach Ayesha Rollinson

Fall usually means one of two types of training cycles for multisport athletes in North America.  Some will continue to compete and focus on running or cycle cross. The second group may take time off and eventually start rebuilding their sport specific fitness.

Both groups should be using water workouts as part of their training and recovery.

For triathletes it is incredibly important to swim 12 months of the year.  Many elite swimmers never take time off out of the water. Losing your ‘feel’ (or proprioception) in the water happens more quickly in swimming than other sports so it is imperative that triathletes swim on a weekly basis.  I recommend that my athletes swim at least twice a week.  Swim workouts do not need to be hard or long during the fall season.  In fact, I would recommend quite the opposite.  The fall season is a great time to make technical changes to your stroke that you put off during the heavy training months. Investing time to get videotaped, either by a friend or coach, could ensure that you are putting your focus in the areas that will give you the biggest speed payback. If you train in a group setting, this is the time of year to drop down to a slower lane to reduce the pressure to swim fast.  This way you can concentrate on proper technique.  It is also the time of year to be the squeaky wheel and to ask your coach for help with your stroke.

For the athlete that chooses to do leg based races in the fall the pool should also be incorporated into their training plan as part of their recovery strategy.  Recovery is accelerated when it is active.  Blood is returned to the heart with the help of muscle contractions and by the chest’s ‘pumping’ action when breathing. Your veins are squeezed between your muscles when they contract and the blood is forced upwards towards the heart. The blood is prevented from returning due to gravity thanks to one-way valves in your veins.  Muscle movement results in a larger volume of circulating blood which means that more nutrients and oxygen are delivered to your tissues for repair.  Swimming and water running are two of the best types of recovery exercise because they increase muscle contraction and breathing rates without eccentrically loading leg muscles.  Eccentric exercises involve any exercise where a muscle is weight bearing in a lengthened position.  An example is the eccentric load on the hamstring when the foot strikes while running. The hamstring is in the lengthened position but it is bearing the weight of your body. Eccentric muscular-skeletal loading can further damage muscle tissue and delay recovery.  To best use swimming and water running as recovery strategies you should get to the pool within 24 hours of a hard leg workout.

The idea of heading to the pool to get wet may not be enticing when the weather starts throwing snow and rain at you.  Convince yourself to make the trip with the promise of a hot shower, a sauna or a steam bath after your session.  Bring a warm sweater, joggers and your warmest toque to snuggle into post practice.  However you motivate yourself to do it, get to the pool at this time of year. Your body will be the better for it.

 


Mark Naphin

You want to know how 7systems helped me do more? How about getting me through the Canadian Death Race with a stress fracture in my ankle! Just this past weekend I partook in the Canadian Death Race and was able to haul my self to the finish line in a time of 23 hours and 16 minutes. I am proud to say I finished 116 out of 360 racers and I did it all with a stress fracture in my navicular bone of which I suffered two weeks prior to the race.

If you are not familiar with the Death Race it is a 125km ultra running event in Grande Cache Alberta. It has 17000 feet of vertical over 3 mountains. Only one third of the 360 racers actually finished the race and the conditions this year were terrible. I got poured on for around 12 hours. All through the night and into the next morning. Through rain slick rocks and muddy so slippery you had to crawl at points I still made it through and my energy levels were up and I felt pretty damn solid the whole way through.

I was able to keep a positive frame of mind and my body held up with flying colours. One of the most impressive things about 7SYSTEMS for me was not so much the race but the recovery, 3 days out my legs feel great and all soreness has dissipated. Thanks allot for a great product.


Will Omega-3 Fish Oil Help the Immune System?- By Larry L. Taylor

Omega-3 fatty acid fish oil can boost the immune system especially when taken with the correct multi-nutrient supplement. Let me explain what I mean.

What the Immune System Does

The immune system of the human body consists of many organs, including the skin, proteins within the bloodstream, cells and tissues. Its function is to prevent diseases, infections and tumors. Yet, for a variety of reasons, it does not always work as it should. A variety of nutritional supplements can be used to promote healthy immune system function. One of them is fish oil, because of the omega-3 fatty acids it contains.

In immunodeficiency diseases, the body cannot fight off disease or infection. These diseases are life threatening and require, lifestyle and pharmaceutical interventions, as well as nutritional support, if the patient is to survive.

Autoimmune diseases are much more common. In these diseases, the immune system attacks healthy cells, in the same way that it would attack an invading pathogen. Some of the most common autoimmune diseases include rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. But, chronic inflammation plays a role in many other diseases, some of which are life-threatening.

 

Inflammation & Fish Oil

Inflammation is a natural immune system response to infection. Injured or infected cells release eicosanoids and cytokines. These are the molecules that cause redness and swelling. But, in many cases, they are present in the bloodstream when there is no infection; no reason for inflammation.

 

Here’s why fish oil is beneficial.

1) Inflammation Affects Joints, Arteries, Heart…

Omega-3 fatty acids are converted within the body into anti-inflammatory molecules, while omega-6s are converted to inflammatory ones. Most people get too many omega6s in the diet and not enough omega-3s. So, inflammation is negatively affecting their joints and arteries, as well as all of the cells of the body. Chronic inflammation is even a factor that supports the growth of cancerous tumors. A good fish oil supplement can help restore the balance, support the joints and arteries, prevent cancer and heart disease.

2) Allergies, Asthma, Dermatitis…

Studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for preventing allergies, asthma and other types of hypersensitivities. Hypersensitivity is similar to an autoimmune disease, in that it is an inappropriate response to a non-toxic substance. Dermatitis (itchy and inflamed skin) is a type of hypersensitivity.

 

Fish Oil & Multi-Nutrient Supplement- Powerful Combination

People that frequently have colds, upper respiratory infections, influenza or other common illnesses have a poorly functioning immune system. This may be due to an underlying illness. But, it is often due to inadequate nutritional intake. Fish oil provides the necessary omega-3 fatty acids, but alone is not enough to reduce the risk of catching a cold or the flu. All of the essential vitamins and minerals, as well as trace elements and cofactors are needed for the body to prevent viruses from replicating and causing an infection.

 

Use Distilled Fish Oil ONLY

All fish oil supplements should be molecularly distilled. Otherwise they are likely to contain contaminants, such as mercury and cancer-causing dioxins. The percentage of omega-3 fatty acids in a supplement, as well as the type, varies from one fish species to another. Manufacturers should list the amount of each omega3 that the supplement provides somewhere on the label.

It may be necessary to do a little research in order to be sure that the oils are molecularly distilled. But, if you want the benefits to your immune system, you should take the time to do the research. The good news is that I have done that. Please see my website listed below for more information on the benefits of fish oil. Thanks, Larry L. Taylor

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Larry_L._Taylor


2011 PRO TEAM

Based on the unprecedented success of the 2010 7SYSTEMS team, the entire team is returning to compete again in 2011.  As well, there are three new additions to the team that are remarkable individuals committed to DOING MORE and doing it better.

NEW 2011 TEAM MEMBERS

Plus Paula Findlay: Paula Findlay is young triathlete with an impressive list of accomplishments. This year alone she has won three World championship series races consecutively, one each in Sydney, Kitzbuhel and Madrid and took a third at the Mooloolaba World Cup.  Read more about Paula.

Annamay Pierse: Annamay is a member of Canada’s national swim team and the current world record holder for the women’s 200m breaststroke.  Annamay was a member of the 2008 Canadian Olympic team in Beijing and is currently preparing for London in 2012.

Max Plaxton: Perhaps one of  Canada’s top male mountain biker and is a London 2012 hopeful.  Max is a professional mountain biker, five-time National Champion and two-time World Champion in the relay event. He currently is one of four team members in USA factory team Specialized/Sho-air which is a professional cross-country mountain bike team.  This year he has won the Canadian National Championships and is the US Pro Cross-Country Tour overall champion with 3 wins. Read his full profile.

Reid Coolsaet: He’s been running cross-country ever since the sixth grade and hasn’t missed a single season.
Reid is a 7-time 5000m Canadian Champion and also credits the 10 000m,  marathon and cross-country running titles to his name.  He has participated at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, 4 IAAF World Cross Country Championships and 2 World Track & Field Championships.   Coolsaet just ran 2:11:23, the fastest time ever run by a Canadian on Canadian soil, at the 2010 Scotiabank Toronto Marathon. This time is 6 seconds faster than the Canadian Olympic marathon standard.

RETURNING ATHLETES FROM 2010

Jasper Blake www.jasper.is: Professional Triathlete, Ironman Champion

Mike Neill www.mikeneill.com: Professional Triathlete, Owner/Head coach Human Powered Racing

Simon Whitfield www.simonwhitfield.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist Triathlete

Adam Van Koueverden www.vankayak.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist, World Champion Kayaker

Lauren Groves-Campbell Lauren Groves blogspot: 2008 Beijing Olympian Triathlete

Adam Campbell Adam Campbell Blogspot: Top Canadian Runner

Ray Zahab www.rayzahab.com: Ultra distance running legend

Malcolm Howard http://malcolmhoward.ca/: World champion, Olympic Champion Rower

Kyle Jones www.kylejones.ca: Canadian Short Course Triathlon Team

Erinne Willock Profile for Erinne Willock: Professional Road Cyclist, 2008 Beijing Olympian

Megan Brown Profile of Megan Brown: Top Canadian Runner

7SYSTEMS works with individuals not only as company ambassadors but as athletes who are committed to using the product and sharing the benefits with others. Last year there were hundreds of applicants and the team was picked on the basis of podium finishes, amazing athletic feats and strength of character.


Linnea Humphrey Scores at Florida Ironman

Here is the latest news from “Linnea Racing”…

“I competed in Ironman Florida on Nov 6th and had a spectacular race for me.  I finished in 9:58:09, swim of :59, bike of 5:19 (ok, that wasn’t so great), and a run of….. get this… 3:29!!!
 
I was second amateur woman, 10th woman overall, and 2nd in my Age Group (who would have guessed that the two fastest amateur women would both be 40-44 argh!  We were also the only amateur women to go under 10hrs).  My run time was also the 3rd fastest female amateur split.
 
I have to tell you that Glenn was sick for two weeks before the race, and I was with him when he was most contagious…and while I didn’t feel totally awesome the few days leading up to the race, I never got sick and by Thursday I felt fine (so I think was like a factor of taper fatigue).
 
Anyway, in part 7SYSTEMS is to thank for getting me to the line healthy, uninjured and ready to go.”


Top 7 Marathon Tips- by Jasper Blake

1- Warm up

Warming up for any event is crucial but not all warm ups are created equally.  It’s important to have several different warm strategies in place.  There are numerous factors that affect what type of warm up to do.  For example warming up for an endurance event when it’s incredibly hot requires some tempering.  There is no sense spending an hour depleting your body of water and electrolytes before the race even starts.  You still need to get your muscles and heart ready to do work but you need to factor in the cost.  For marathons a similar problem occurs.  How much time can you really spend warming up when the race itself is going to take 2.5-6+ hours depending on who you are.  Typically the shorter the race the more warm up is required and conversely the longer the race the less warm up is required.  This is in part due to the pace you are going to go (shorter is much faster) and in part due to the actual energy loss you can afford to give up.  For marathons you shouldn’t need more than about ten minutes of light jogging and some strides to really get warmed up.  Of course if you are an elite runner and aiming for a time in the low two hour mark you will likely need to get your lactic buffers fired up but if you are in the 4 hour plus crowd the first few miles will do just fine.

2- What to wear

Obviously weather is a huge component of longer races.  You cannot get away with something that is too hot or two cold when you have 3+ hours ahead of you.  It’s important to know what the conditions will be like and dress appropriately.  As a general rule you are likely to feel warmer when you are racing than when you are training probably in part due to the intensity.  Probably the number one rule when considering longer events is to make sure that you are comfortable above all else.  Wear what you feel good wearing and that includes your footwear.  Never make drastic changes on race day unless you have tried them in training and know you will be comfortable. 

3- Blisters and Chaffing

It’s rare that we ever run a marathon in training when preparing for a marathon.  It’s important to know that chaffing and blisters can happen when the length of time increases.  You may not experience either of these things in training simply because you may not have run for that long before.  It’s better to prepare for these two things and avoid them all together. 

Blisters are obviously most common on the feet.  There are several strategies that can help you avoid blisters.  Double layer socks are a great idea.  A company called “wright sock” make very lightweight, thin socks that are perfect in any shoe.  The basic idea is that the layers of sock rub against each other opposed to your skin rubbing against the sock.  There are several great products out there in cream or powder form that can also help stave off blisters that are easily massaged into the feet or put into the shoes.  

Chaffing is a different story.  Chaffing can happen in some of the most unexpected places and it’s a good idea to prepare accordingly.  Some common places for chaffing are inner thighs, underarms and nipples.  Combine the constant rub of clothing or skin on skin mixed with a bit of moisture and salt and it can be a painful experience.  Chaffing can be avoided with the right clothing and of course some anti-friction cream.  I’ve even seen people put band-aids on their nipples, which is as effective as it is interesting.

4- Pacing

Pacing is probably the most important aspect in a marathon.  You must have a plan when it comes to pacing or chances are that you will go out too fast.  The longer the event the less chance you have to do anything different than you have been doing in training.  By the time the marathon rolls around you should be well versed in your pace and should stick too it.  There is a tendency in races to feel very good particularly in the beginning and this can lead people out of their appropriate pace very quickly.  Inevitably it will come back to haunt you in the later stages if you go too far beyond your capacity.  At larger marathons it’s common to have “pace bunnies”, people who are designated to hit a certain pace so you can run and pace off of them.  Regardless, most races are usually marked in miles or kilometers and all you need is a stopwatch to figure it out.  Stay on pace and you have a greater chance of reaching your goals.

5- Mental Resiliance

One of the best mental strategies you can have for a marathon is to break it into pieces.  The thought of 26 miles or 42km can be daunting.  However most people are comfortable with one mile.  So instead of running 26 miles run one mile, then another, then another and so on.  It’s also a good idea to be familiar with the course.  Often a route seems longer when we first do it but as you do it more and more it gets smaller in your head.  The brain likes familiarity and if the route has been studied it’s easier for the brain to manage.

6- Nutrition and Hydration

The longer the event the more important nutrition becomes.  Anything up to an hour and nutrition is almost a mute point.  The body typically has enough glycogen stores to last 60-90 minutes but beyond that it needs a steady stream of carbohydrate to keep going.  Anyone who has bonked knows what it feels like to have depleted glycogen stores.  It doesn’t matter how fit you are, if you run out of glycogen it will seriously affect your day.  It’s important to have a plan that you have tried in practice.  It’s also important to know what they have on the course and know that you can handle consuming what they provide.  Typically aid stations are every 1-3 miles so it’s also valuable to know the timeframe with which you will have access to nutrition.  If you are on the slower side it might be a good idea to bring your own.  The best strategy is to take little amounts frequently so as never to dump too much sugar into your gut at once.  As intensity goes your ability to absorb calories decreases and vice versa.

Hydration is a major factor in longer events.  Water loss happens from the blood stream, which makes the blood thicker and harder for your heart to move.  This causes an increase in your effort level.  Water loss also decreases ones ability to cool down.  We sweat so that our body can regulate its core temperature.  Sweat on the skin has a cooling effect.  If we lose too much water we decrease our bodies ability to cool down which increases core body temperature and increases perceived effort.  Hydrating during long events needs to happen at regular intervals.  Like caloric intake, we can only absorb so much water at one time.  Dumping too much fluid into the gut at once is a recipe for disaster.  Sodium loss and intake also becomes an important factor when we consider hydration.  Most sports drinks have sodium for a reason.  Sweat contains salt and the more we lose the harder it is for us to move water from the gut to the blood stream.  Bloating is one of the major side effects of sodium depletion.  When the blood is low in sodium the osmotic gradient required to move fluid across membranes no longer exists and water sits in the gut.  You can have great quantities of fluid in your gut but if it’s not in your blood stream you can still be severely dehydrated.

7- Recovery

The marathon is probably one of the hardest events to fully recover from.  It’s easy to ride your bike or swim for several hours but the repeated pounding that happens when we run really takes a toll on the body.  There is a reason why people rarely actually run a marathon in training prior to the actual event, it just takes too long to recover from.  Studies have shown that even 3-4 weeks post marathon there can be micro-tears in the muscle indicating that they are still not recovered. 

There are several strategies you can use to recover quicker from a marathon. 

  • Stick to low or no impact sports for at least two weeks
  • Limit the time on your feet to walking for a couple of weeks
  • If you must run try water running- a low impact alternative
  • Focus on great nutrition and lean protein to help muscles rebuild
  • Contrast as in hot/cold treatment work wonders
  • Massage or any physical contact that promotes blood flow to muscle groups is a very good idea
  • Replace sodium and fluid that has been lost
  • Sleep- nothing is as restorative as sleep


Bill Logie

Bill Logie has been an athlete all his life.   A former semi-professional soccer player, Bill now packs adventure racing, run and snowshoe races, mounatin biking, Xterra events and kite boarding into his busy life.  He balances this ‘play time’ with his Bay Street career as a highly successful stock trader.  We are confident saying Bill is one of the most diverse athletes Ontario has to offer, and 2009 was one his best racing seasons ever.  As one of the longest users of 7SYSTEMS we thought it would be appropriate to congratulate Bill on an amazing season. 
bill logie
“I never thought that as I turned 40 I would actually be getting stronger and stronger .  I started with a stellar snowshoeing season, setting a course record and beating one of my fiercest competitors in a 10km classic up and down the slopes of the Blue Mountains.  I then finished first and second in two running events and finished first in a Duke’s Epic 8 solo mountain bike race for my age (second overall, losing to a pro).  To top it all off, I had a great race at the Xterra World Championships in Hawaii, where I finished 13th out of 60 in my category on a gruelling course.
 
Throughout the season, I’ve felt my body recover each time I challenged it with a new workout or competition.  Most importantly, I never seemed to breakdown or get sick.  I’m confident 7SYSTEMS makes a big difference in my ability to stay healthy and recover by giving my body’s systems the support they needed.  7SYSTEMS works for me like no other supplement I’ve used before.  I am looking forward to what I can do as a 41 year old!”


Ajay Kohli

WINNER

7 Systems Do More Contest from Mark Kennedy on Vimeo.

Target Race: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure 5 km on Sunday, October 3, 2010.

Target Time: 27:00

TARGET RACE REPORT

Ajay finished in a time of 21:19 not only exceeding the 7% improvement target but also shattering his 14% stretch target for an improvement of 27%!

Congratulations to Ajay and the lifestyle transformation he has made.

“Over the past year and a half I have shed over 75 lbs, made healthier lifestyle and dietary choices, as well as improved my race time by 27%. Without a doubt these choices and accomplishments have been fueled by my desire to set and achieve my goals.

Wanting and desiring success is much different than just talking about it, you need to believe in it and then act on those beliefs. Believing in yourself is empowering. It also sets the tone necessary for you to be successful. Equally important, support mechanisms, be it people and or products can significantly accelerate and influence your progress.

With that said, there are many factors that contribute to success. Setting goals, optimizing your experiences and meaningful use of your resources are extremely important. I’m thankful for 7 SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement, to JJ Neely and “Focus In Training” none of my successes would have been possible without their continual support and guidance. Thank you for your products and dedication!”

AUGUST UPDATE

Since starting 7 SYSTEMS I have seen a substantial increase in my training abilities. I have noticed this month that I am able to run, bike and swim harder. I have also noticed an increase in energy levels and weight loss. My training is more consistent and my training gains have increased. With the help of 7SYSTEMS I hope to acheive my goal at the Breast Cancer 5km run.

JULY UPDATE

Throughout the month of July, I believe my training has gone rather well. With the use of 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement I have found that I have the extra energy and endurance I need to complete my training. I have also been able to increase the number of training sessions I can do every week to help accomplish my goal of a 5km run in 27 minutes.

ABOUT AJAY

For the past 38 years I have lived my life with not a care in the world. During those years I engaged in an extremely unhealthy lifestyle that affected my daily life. I would usually smoke a pack of cigarettes a day, drink frequently and use food as a means of escape from every day stress. I started to notice deterioration in my health and a lack of energy. The total impact left me with no motivation to interact with my children at the end of the day. I looked old, felt old, and was almost 50 pounds overweight plus nothing felt right. I was heading down the road to Diabetes, heart condition and possible high blood pressure.  As of last July 2009 I decided to make some changes. I quit smoking cold turkey.  I also stopped drinking.  I started to watch what I ate and have now lost almost 50 pounds.  Most importantly I took up the sport of running. This has given me a whole new outlook on life and a determination to succeed. I have just completed my first Triathlon I and hope to compete in an Iron Man one day.  For my Target Race, I actually believe I can shatter my 5km race time of 29.03 not by 7%, but by 14%!  Failure is not an option.


Andrea Perego

andrea-perego-run_2“I began taking 7Systems when I was determined to make the most of my recovery time between two Ironman races and I have been taking them ever since.  I am not the fastest or the fittest triathlete out there, and despite my coach’s best efforts, I don’t always do my workouts the way I am supposed to.  I have been known to stack hard workout on top of hard workout and fill my days off with things like squash or just running around trying to get a thousand things done at once.  Despite all that, I still recover quickly and am ready for the next workout.  And I just don’t get sick.  I travel now and then for work and it is so easy to take along.  You just can’t argue with all of that.

Thanks for making a great product that is so easy to use.   I am a believer.”

Andrea is an accomplished age-groupers who juggle straining with her busy job on Bay Street in Torono.