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2012 PRO TEAM

NEWS RELEASE 

We’re not saying it’s because of 7SYSTEMS, we’re just saying…

Three 7SYSTEMS athletes named to Canadian Olympic Team

April 26th, 2012, TORONTO, ON: The team at 7SYSTEMS congratulates the Canadian Olympic Marathon team announced today at Alumni Stadium, University of Guelph.

Reid Coolsaet, Eric Gillis and most recently Dylan Wykes have all met the qualifying standard for London 2012, and they are all 7SYSTEMS athletes! Wykes and Gillis are relatively new additions to the 7SYSTEMS team and we are so happy we were able to support them on the Road to London. Canada will be well represented at this year’s marathon and we are proud to be providing the supplement needs of all three marathoners.

The Canadians presence in London will mark the first time Canada has had three entries in the Olympic marathon since Peter Fonseca, Carey Nelson and Bruce Deacon ran the marathon for Canada in the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games.

 “We’re very excited about the number of 7SYSTEMS athletes that will be competing at the upcoming games. London 2012 is going to be a great event for Canada and for many of our athletes,” said Jasper Blake, 7SYSTEMS founder and Pro Ironman™ Triathlete. “We work with many of the top-ranked athletes in the country to ensure their nutritional requirements are being met. And, considering we don’t pay our athletes to endorse us, we must be doing a good job! All of our athletes consider 7SYSTEMS an important part of their training regimen and we’re just happy to do our part for this Olympic year and many more to come!”

Reid Coolsaet, from Hamilton, and Eric Gillis, from Guelph, qualified for the Games at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon in October, 2011. Dylan Wykes, from Kingston, ran a 2:10:47 in Rotterdam, Netherlands last week.

These three 7SYSTEMS athletes are the first of certainly many more to be named to the Canadian Olympic Team. Simon Whitfield, Paula Findlay and Malcolm Howard have all met the Canadian Olympic standard in their sports. As well, Adam Van Koueverden and Lauren Groves are still racing for a spot on the London 2012 team.

For a full list of the 7SYSTEMS athletes that have met the Canadian Olympic standard, and for athlete updates, information on their training and research notes please visit: www.7SYSTEMS.ca

About 7SYSTEMS

 7SYSTEMS endurance sport supplement contains over 60 key ingredients to help athletes recover faster and stay healthy. Developed by athletes for athletes, 7SYSTEMS contributes to basic body health and supports the body’s critical systems. 7SYSTEMS is more complete, more capable and available in more convenient daily supplement pouches. 

Tested by high performance athletes, 7SYSTEMS endurance sport supplement is being credited by many athletes as a factor in their success.  7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement is manufactured by Douglas Laboratories, a well known and respected company that meets or exceeds Health Canada’s Good Manufacturing Practices in its operations and is one of only a few ISO certified nutritional supplement manufacturers in North America. Douglas Labs does not handle any of the raw compounds on the WADA banned substance list.

 In a comparative study, 7SYSTEMS manufacturer ranked 9.4 on a 10 point effectiveness scale, one of only a few supplements that scored over the 8.0 ‘excellent’ rating. The effectiveness score considers factors like: potency, bio-availability, potency, composition and synergistic effect. Most store bought ‘sport’ brands scored 4.0 or less.

For more information and research notes please visit: www.7SYSTEMS.ca

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For More Information:

Stacie Smith, Smith Communications, Stacie@smithcommunications.ca, (416) 910-8112

 

 


Run Economy & Resistance Training

By Megan Brown

As runners, our main goal is to get the finish line as fast as we can and in most cases, ahead of as many people as possible. To achieve this goal, we set up complex training plans which include: long runs, shorter aerobic runs, tempo/threshold intervals, speed intervals and hill repeats.

 

Now, what if I told you that you could also get faster by investing some extra time in ‘NON-running’ workouts?

 

No, I am not referring to hitting the pool or jumping on your bike! I am suggesting that you can get faster as a runner by hitting the gym for strength and resistance training.

 

You have probably heard many times that RESISTANCE TRAINING can improve run performance. Some cite reasons such as ‘increased strength’ or ‘increased power’ or even ‘fatigue resistance’ for improved performance. Although many of these outcomes do lead to performance enhancement, resistance training, if done properly, has the most profound impact on performance because of its effect on run economy.

 

RUN ECONOMY is formally defined as the amount of oxygen consumed to run a given speed for a given distance. To illustrate: Erin may require 49ml of oxygen to run a 4:30 km, while it may cost Wes 54ml of oxygen to run his 4:30 km, making him ‘less economical’. With all things being equal, who do you expect to get to the finish line first? I bet you wish you were Erin!

 

You can also understand this concept by comparing your body to a car, and oxygen to gas; the more economical your car, the less gas you require to get from A to B at a given speed. And since gas (oxygen) is one of the limiting factors of performance, you want be as economical as possible.

 

Interestingly, most recreational (and even professional) runners loose a great deal of economy through their RUN MECHANICS. Below are some of the more common mechanical flaws:

  1. Hip instability
  2. Slow foot contact time
  3. Poor hamstring activation
  4. Insufficient knee drive

Therefore, a sound (run-specific) strength and resistance program that focuses on improving hip & core strength, foot contract time, hamstring activation and knee drive will inevitably make you a faster, more economical runner.

Below are examples of exercises that might be seen in such a program:

1)     Hip raise with hip abduction against resistance

– lie on you back, knees bent and feet firmly planted on the ground with resistance band around your knees

– raise your hips forming an incline bridge while pushing your knees out against resistance

*Start with 1 set of 12, move to 2 sets of 12-10 then 3 sets of 12-10-8

2)   Plank on swiss ball – “Stir the pot”

– form a plank on your elbows on a medium sized swiss ball

– contract your core while ensuring the integrity of your back stays strong

– use your forearms to ‘stir’ the swiss ball to the right and then to left while keep plank stable

* Start with 1 sets of 6xeach way; 2 sets of 6x each way; 3 sets of 6x each way 

3)     Hip raise with single straight leg

–        Lie on your back with your left knee bent and foot firm planted on the ground and right leg straight on the ground

–        Raise your hip (as in #1) while keeping your right leg straight; focus on leading the movement with your right leg so that your right hip is parallel with left hip and the end of the movement

–        Lower hip (and right leg) + repeat

–        To add a challenge, you can have the foot of your bent leg on a medicine ball creating an unstable surface

*Start with 1 set of 12x each leg then 2sets of 12xeach leg + 10xeach leg

4)     Running A’s against resistance 

–        Anchor a strong looped resistance band around a stable pole or piece of equipment  

–        With your back to equipment and the resistance band at waist level, run as hard as you can forward against the resistance

–        If done properly, the resistance band should keep you running in one spot despite your efforts to power forward

–        Continue to lean slightly forward and drive your knees, executing a perfect running motion

–        5-8 sets of 10sec; powerful running with high knees and perfect body condition

Thanks Megan Brown for providing us with this awesome article about run economy. Megan is a multiple-time Canadian cross country running champion and the current Canadian 1/2 marathon championShe coaches a wide array of runners in Toronto as part of MB Performance and can be reached at megan.brown2012@gmail.com


Everybody into the Pool

By Coach Ayesha Rollinson

Fall usually means one of two types of training cycles for multisport athletes in North America.  Some will continue to compete and focus on running or cycle cross. The second group may take time off and eventually start rebuilding their sport specific fitness.

Both groups should be using water workouts as part of their training and recovery.

For triathletes it is incredibly important to swim 12 months of the year.  Many elite swimmers never take time off out of the water. Losing your ‘feel’ (or proprioception) in the water happens more quickly in swimming than other sports so it is imperative that triathletes swim on a weekly basis.  I recommend that my athletes swim at least twice a week.  Swim workouts do not need to be hard or long during the fall season.  In fact, I would recommend quite the opposite.  The fall season is a great time to make technical changes to your stroke that you put off during the heavy training months. Investing time to get videotaped, either by a friend or coach, could ensure that you are putting your focus in the areas that will give you the biggest speed payback. If you train in a group setting, this is the time of year to drop down to a slower lane to reduce the pressure to swim fast.  This way you can concentrate on proper technique.  It is also the time of year to be the squeaky wheel and to ask your coach for help with your stroke.

For the athlete that chooses to do leg based races in the fall the pool should also be incorporated into their training plan as part of their recovery strategy.  Recovery is accelerated when it is active.  Blood is returned to the heart with the help of muscle contractions and by the chest’s ‘pumping’ action when breathing. Your veins are squeezed between your muscles when they contract and the blood is forced upwards towards the heart. The blood is prevented from returning due to gravity thanks to one-way valves in your veins.  Muscle movement results in a larger volume of circulating blood which means that more nutrients and oxygen are delivered to your tissues for repair.  Swimming and water running are two of the best types of recovery exercise because they increase muscle contraction and breathing rates without eccentrically loading leg muscles.  Eccentric exercises involve any exercise where a muscle is weight bearing in a lengthened position.  An example is the eccentric load on the hamstring when the foot strikes while running. The hamstring is in the lengthened position but it is bearing the weight of your body. Eccentric muscular-skeletal loading can further damage muscle tissue and delay recovery.  To best use swimming and water running as recovery strategies you should get to the pool within 24 hours of a hard leg workout.

The idea of heading to the pool to get wet may not be enticing when the weather starts throwing snow and rain at you.  Convince yourself to make the trip with the promise of a hot shower, a sauna or a steam bath after your session.  Bring a warm sweater, joggers and your warmest toque to snuggle into post practice.  However you motivate yourself to do it, get to the pool at this time of year. Your body will be the better for it.

 


Adam Campbell’s Five Running Tips for Long Runs

1- Pacing is everything

Starting out at a very conservative pace will pay huge dividends in the end. I often use the first 1-2 miles as warm-up and then I settle into my goal race pace and then try to pick up the pace over the last 1/3 of the race. I have had my best results when I paced the opening miles properly and have suffered horribly at the end when I haven’t.

2-Plan for adversity

I find that most people focus on and visualize having a perfect day, but things rarely go according to plan in endurance races. When the athlete has something go wrong they are mentally unprepared and it throws them off their game. Rather, expected the unexpected and be pleasantly surprised when things go right. It’s win-win

3-Focus on form & Have a routine

The main difficulty with endurance races is staying focused and in the moment. Having form cues, that you have used in training, can keep you engaged when you catch your mind wandering. If you have a coach, use the cues that they have given you, or if you don’t simple words like relax, or quick feet etc… can bring your mind back into the moment. Much like form, I find that having a routine in the race helps me stay engaged.For instance, I plan when and what I will eat and drink and I focus on that task.

4- Celebrate success

Endurance racing at its core comes down to discomfort. How much discomfort can you handle, while still being efficient & fast? I find that celebrating successes along the way with a smile, a fist pump, a little surge etc.. give me a mental boost. I usually celebrate distance milestones in the race, such as 1/3 done, 3/4 done, or managing  hill section well, gives me a mental boost. I never focus on how much I have left, just what I have already done.

5-When you feel good eat &/or drink, when you feel bad eat &/or drink

I can’t take credit for this mantra, I believe it was either Dave Scott, or Mark Allen who coined it, but it has been invaluable to my ultra-racing. I find that my mood directly reflects whether or not I am properly fueled, so when I stop being engaged in the moment and start to get too confident, or overwhelmed with what I have left to do, I focus on nutrition.


2011 PRO TEAM

Based on the unprecedented success of the 2010 7SYSTEMS team, the entire team is returning to compete again in 2011.  As well, there are three new additions to the team that are remarkable individuals committed to DOING MORE and doing it better.

NEW 2011 TEAM MEMBERS

Plus Paula Findlay: Paula Findlay is young triathlete with an impressive list of accomplishments. This year alone she has won three World championship series races consecutively, one each in Sydney, Kitzbuhel and Madrid and took a third at the Mooloolaba World Cup.  Read more about Paula.

Annamay Pierse: Annamay is a member of Canada’s national swim team and the current world record holder for the women’s 200m breaststroke.  Annamay was a member of the 2008 Canadian Olympic team in Beijing and is currently preparing for London in 2012.

Max Plaxton: Perhaps one of  Canada’s top male mountain biker and is a London 2012 hopeful.  Max is a professional mountain biker, five-time National Champion and two-time World Champion in the relay event. He currently is one of four team members in USA factory team Specialized/Sho-air which is a professional cross-country mountain bike team.  This year he has won the Canadian National Championships and is the US Pro Cross-Country Tour overall champion with 3 wins. Read his full profile.

Reid Coolsaet: He’s been running cross-country ever since the sixth grade and hasn’t missed a single season.
Reid is a 7-time 5000m Canadian Champion and also credits the 10 000m,  marathon and cross-country running titles to his name.  He has participated at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, 4 IAAF World Cross Country Championships and 2 World Track & Field Championships.   Coolsaet just ran 2:11:23, the fastest time ever run by a Canadian on Canadian soil, at the 2010 Scotiabank Toronto Marathon. This time is 6 seconds faster than the Canadian Olympic marathon standard.

RETURNING ATHLETES FROM 2010

Jasper Blake www.jasper.is: Professional Triathlete, Ironman Champion

Mike Neill www.mikeneill.com: Professional Triathlete, Owner/Head coach Human Powered Racing

Simon Whitfield www.simonwhitfield.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist Triathlete

Adam Van Koueverden www.vankayak.com: Multiple Olympic Medalist, World Champion Kayaker

Lauren Groves-Campbell Lauren Groves blogspot: 2008 Beijing Olympian Triathlete

Adam Campbell Adam Campbell Blogspot: Top Canadian Runner

Ray Zahab www.rayzahab.com: Ultra distance running legend

Malcolm Howard http://malcolmhoward.ca/: World champion, Olympic Champion Rower

Kyle Jones www.kylejones.ca: Canadian Short Course Triathlon Team

Erinne Willock Profile for Erinne Willock: Professional Road Cyclist, 2008 Beijing Olympian

Megan Brown Profile of Megan Brown: Top Canadian Runner

7SYSTEMS works with individuals not only as company ambassadors but as athletes who are committed to using the product and sharing the benefits with others. Last year there were hundreds of applicants and the team was picked on the basis of podium finishes, amazing athletic feats and strength of character.


Overview of Supplement Manufacturing

Where do those little pills come from, anyway?

Written by: Jonathan Toker, Ph.D., developer of SaltStick product

Consumers generally take for granted that the contents inside a bottle of supplement X matches exactly the label on the outside. Fortunately and for the most part, thanks to the rules currently in place, this is true. However, there are multiple opportunities during production where the contents of the bottle may no longer be represented correctly by the label. Somewhat analogous to bicycle frame builders, most brands of nutritional supplements are manufactured in a limited number of facilities, or contract labs. It’s not economically feasible for a small company with a product line of nutritional supplements to have its own production facility.

Contract labs specialize in production of supplements, analytical testing, and packaging. These labs can be either cGMP or non-cGMP compliant at this time, and the resulting product could be affected by the way the company treats each batch of product being produced. Until 2010, supplements can be legally produced in non-cGMP facilities. The actual contract lab used by any given supplement company is usually a guarded secret as part of one’s competitive advantage. Therefore, rather than looking to the name on the bottle, one must look at the actual contract lab as the source of the product, and the inherent production risks.

From start to finish at a contract lab

a) Starting Materials

Most contract labs source their raw materials from a wide range of outside suppliers, many of whom specialize in certain classes of materials, such as amino acids, protein powders, minerals, etc. Each supplier provides to the contract lab a certificate of analysis (COA) that is issued for each and every lot (batch) of raw material. Suppliers can be located overseas or domestically with the actual starting material produced anywhere around the world.

When raw materials are received by a contract lab, they should be positively identified. This is usually done easily and quickly by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. By matching a characteristic fingerprint spectrum of the raw material with a reference spectrum for the material, identity can be confirmed. Purity (the percent active content of the material) is not usually assayed at this time, depending on the COA of the material for this and any other details. This is the first intersection where impurities that originated in the starting material factory or packaging would enter the contract lab undetected. Note that the NIR identity confirmation is not sensitive to pick up foreign matter in the raw material and is a bulk test only. 

An entirely different set of concerns arises with herbal ingredients. Many materials such as St. John’s wort, royal jelly, ginkgo biloba, yucca root, grape seed extract, and many others originate from plant extracts. Currently, there are few standards in place to qualify these raw materials for potency or purity. This means that a bottle containing 100 percent St. John’s wort may actually have 5 percent active while another labeled the same way may have double or triple that amount. The FDA final rule guidance on these materials is still 100 percent identification testing, which is problematic due to current analytical testing limitations of some of these materials. At this time, manufacturers can apply for an exemption to this testing. It is hoped within the herbal industry that further clarity on this situation will arise before the FDA final rule takes effect.

As a result of these regulations, products containing herbal ingredients are generally non-standardized and consumers need to be especially aware of potential issues with these products. As a visual rule-of-thumb, if the “Supplement Facts” panel indicates “Daily value not established” for a given ingredient, it is likely that less than adequate information is known about that particular ingredient. Not only are herbal ingredients of often unreliable content, but their toxicity and benefits have generally not been tested in clinical settings, which further prompts the warning: buyer beware.

b) Processing of ingredients

Once the raw materials are identified upon receipt, the contract lab prepares the formulation according to specifications required by the supplement company. This can include dry mixing, wet mixing, granulation, and other physical handling steps. Containers used for these processes are part of machines that can be manually or automatically operated. Often made of stainless steel parts, these complex mixing bowls are used for a given batch and then cleaned and readied for the next product, one that may be totally distinct from the batch before and after it. cGMP contract labs will follow a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that dictate how the machine is to be cleaned, rinsed, and dried. Some facilities conduct a “cleaning verification” whereby some of the rinse wash is tested for the active ingredient from the previous batch. Possible source of contamination #2 arises if a machine is incompletely or incorrectly cleaned leading to carryover from one product to another. In this way, for example, a steroid material from one product batch could be carried over to a protein supplement in the next batch of processed product.

c) Encapsulation/bottling/packaging of the product

The final step within the contract lab takes the mixed product into its final form for the consumer. This can include bulk powder in plastic tubs, pressing powder into pills, or filling capsules with powder. Once again, industry-specific machines are used for this step. Careful cleaning between batches of different product is critical to ensuring no cross-contamination between products. Once the product is in its final packaging, a quality control (QC) unit serves to qualify and inspect the final product. Once again following SOPs, the QC analyst inspects the product against specifications that can include fill weight, color, particle size and other physical characteristics.

Testing of the final product for quantitative content of active material is currently not required, but is coming into place with the new regulations by 2010. What this means is that upon QC approval and issuance of a batch-specific certificate of analysis (COA), the product is ready to be released to consumers. What is not positively known at that time is: Was production and mixing even and complete across the batch? Are there any foreign contaminants in the mixture? And most importantly, do the contents of that bottle match the writing on the label? Fortunately, the FDA final rule of June 22, 2007, requires manufacturers to address these questions. For contract labs already following cGMPs, implementation of these rules should be fairly straightforward, although costs to producers are likely to increase due to additional analytical work required. Expect non-cGMP contract labs to get in gear with the rules or face the prospect of shutting down in the coming years.

WADA and the difference between illegal and prohibited substances

At this juncture, it is worth defining the difference between an illegal substance and a prohibited substance. We are all familiar with materials that are regulated by the government that can include cocaine and other opiates, prescription products such as antibiotics, anti-seizure, antidepressants, etc., that are regulated as suitable for certain applications only, under the administration or prescription of a physician. Some of these materials are illegal under any circumstances while others can be used as needed by those to whom permission is granted (usually by a doctor’s prescription).

WADA has defined a list of substances for which their consumption has deemed to be “against the rules” of sport. Athletes who fall within a sport governed by WADA rules are responsible for observing the WADA prohibited substance list. To be clear: WADA-prohibited substances are not necessarily illegal from a regulated standpoint, but are listed because they can provide an athlete with an unfair advantage in sport. The consequence is that some WADA-prohibited substances can legally be produced in the same contract lab as other nutritional supplements. Looking back to the production discussed earlier, one can quickly determine how cross contamination between products can present an otherwise compliant athlete with a tainted product.

Does natural equal safe?

 Health food companies and pundits for healthy living often cite that something is “natural”, implying that this automatically equates to “good” or “safe.” It is worth noting here that the most toxic substances in the world are natural (botulism toxin, and other plant and animal toxins such as from the puffer fish and poison dart frog). In the context of nutritional supplements, your body does not know the difference between purified calcium carbonate from the White Cliffs of Dover and purified chalk produced in a laboratory. While allowing for certain unique natural preparations available only in nature, at a chemical level, there is no difference between a substance in “nature” vs. the “lab.” CaCO3 is CaCO3 wherever you find it. With the above under consideration, it is worth keeping an open mind on both synthetic and natural ingredients, and selecting one over the other as needed and on a scientific basis alone.

Who cares?

With the vast majority of athletes competing at the amateur level, one must ask if it matters if a little bit of X gets in my supplement? Focusing specifically on triathlon, age group athletes are not tested currently at any race except the annual ITU World Championship. Therefore the vast majority of triathletes will never see a drug test. Are they willing to pay a little bit more for a supplement that had been prepared in a cGMP contract lab and tested for WADA prohibited substances? The professionals are tested much more frequently and races worldwide. National governing bodies (NGB) such as USA Triathlon inform their athletes that they must comply with the WADA prohibited substance list, informing athletes that it is their own responsibility to do so. However, other than conducting their own testing or avoiding all nutritional supplements altogether, there is no way that a dedicated professional athlete can ensure that neither the food that they eat nor the supplements they consume are clean. Until now…


2010 PRO TEAM

7SYSTEMS, the endurance sport supplement chosen by Olympians and recreational athletes all over Canada, has named ten athletes to their 2010 PRO TEAM. The team was chosen from among Canada’s top athletes. With hundreds of applicants, the team was picked on the basis of podium finishes, amazing athletic feats and strength of character.

 READ THE FULL PRESS RELEASE.

MORE ABOUT THE ATHLETES
 

  • Jasper Blake: Triathlon – Ironman™
  • Megan Brown: Running – Cross Country / Track and Field
  • Adam Campbell: Running – Marathon
  • Lauren Groves: Triathlon – Olympic Distance
  • Malcolm Howard: Rowing
  • Kyle Jones: Triathlon – Olympic Distance
  • Mike Neill: Triathlon – Ironman™
  • Adam Van Koeverden: Canoe / Kayak
  • Simon Whitfield: Triathlon – Olympic Distance
  • Erinne Willock: Cycling – Road
  • Ray Zahab: Running – Ultra marathons, expeditions
  •  

    Try it now


    What It Takes To Make A Comeback- Megan Brown

    I think what attracts me to distance running is how similar it is to life. I once heard a quote that said, “Running is like life – 10% of it is exciting and 90% is grimy and tough”. There is a lot of truth to this quote! When you think about it, a very minimal part of both distance running and life is effortless. The majority of it requires passion, toughness, tenacity and a will to endure its unending physical, mental and emotional demands. However like life, no matter how hard the 90% gets, something inside tells you to keep on running because that 10% – the victory, the achievement, the sense of satisfaction and peace – just feels so good!

    In the last year and a half, I have faced a tremendous amount of adversity, which at times had me questioning my future in this sport. It all began in January of 2008 as I prepared for my first professional indoor track circuit. After six months of strenuous base work, I was in the shape of my life and prepared for the breakout season that every runner dreams about. It was perfect timing as the Olympic Trials were only six months away. This was going to be my year – I knew it – or so I thought. What began as a terrible flu, progressed into an illness that was later diagnosed as Lymes Disease. Within weeks of the diagnosis, it was evident that my goal of competing at the Olympic Trials and vying of a sport on the Olympic team were not going to be realized. Instead, I would have to come face to face with the illness’ effect on my body and spend the next few months resting and recovering.

    As with any setback, whether an injury or illness, there is always an initial stage of denial. We have a tendency to convince ourselves that ‘It’s not that bad’ – that the best scenario is the most probable – when in fact most signs are indicating otherwise. We don’t want to face the reality that we won’t be able to train or race. However, after spending time in a state of denial, there comes an acknowledgment of the present setback. Of course, with this realization comes a whole array of emotions – disappointment, frustration, anger, sadness, and fear. On a conscious and subconscious level, we are processing these emotions and dealing with the fact that we are unable to do what we love and in some cases, unable to achieve our planned goals.

    In my case, I had to deal with the disappointment of missing one of the biggest seasons of my career thus far. I also had a great deal of frustration and grief regarding my highly fatigued physical state. I spend a lot of time suffering from the ‘why me’ syndrome that continued for days on end. But what I realized through my illness is that the most important part of any setback, whether in sport or life, is ACCEPTANCE. The sooner you process the emotions associated with the let down, the sooner you can move to acceptance of your present state. This allows you to direct your energy towards doing all the proper things (cross training, rest, rehab, nutrition, and different therapies) to get your body back on track. Also with this acceptance comes a restructuring of goals and therefore a new avenue to direct your energy.

    No matter who you are or what level of sport you are involved in – there will be setbacks. It doesn’t matter whether it’s an eight week lay off with a stress fracture, a three month lay-off with an Achilles tear or in my case, a four month lay off with illness, the same process usually occur. In all cases, acceptance of your circumstance, an analysis of the injuries causes, restructuring of goals and a positive attitude towards rehabilitation are required for proper healing and psychological health throughout the setback.

    After the chunk of rehabilitation is done comes the progressive return to specific training and racing. In some cases, the transition back to training is easy – the injury is healed, the progression goes smoothly and before you know it you are back at full tilt. But for many athletes, the comeback is filled with its own challenges. In some cases, the injury isn’t fully healed, so there is the battle of doing just enough, but not so much that you are back at square one. There are also the compensatory injuries that begin to flare up; in favoring the site of injury, other parts of the body begin to hurt. Similarly, there are also the physical symptoms associated with load – after much time off the body struggles to return to previous workloads. You are sore, tired, and lethargic and wondering when your body will begin to feel like its old self. This is a draining process. You want to train hard, push the body and reclaim the fitness you lost, but have to listen to your body’s limitations, which in itself can be a challenge for any motivating athlete.

    For me, my comeback to high level training and racing was a drawn out process, with many challenges along the way. Unfortunately, my healing wasn’t presented in absolute terms and instead was something that would continue for many more months after my return to training. My body was still healing and reclaiming energy while at the same time, I was eager to train and race at a high level again. I felt as if I was in a constant battle with my body. My mind wanted to push, but my body wasn’t ready to handle my previous levels of intensity and load. I know of many athletes who have dealt with this same battle when coming back from injuries. The mind is ready to be aggressive and the motivation is there, but our body limits us. And this is one of the most frustrating and helpless situations that you will face as athlete. All you want to do is train and compete, but the body just won’t let you.

    I unfortunately learned my lesson the hard way, which was that “The body always wins!” As endurance athletes, we know pain; we know perseverance; we know tenacity. But we have trouble with patience. At times, honoring the body’s limitation can seem like an impossible task, but one that is required for a healthy return from any setback.

    Therefore, If ACCEPTANCE is the key for dealing with an injury, PATIENCE is the virtue needed for the comeback. We need to be patient and kind to our bodies and work within its limits, knowing all the while that we will return to a completely healthy state, and if we progress properly, there will be a time when we let loose again! Along with being patient, we have to stay positive. Even on the lowest days, when you feel like you will never be back to 100%, it’s important to keep the faith. You will be back! This is the best time to lean on your support system. Let those supporters who love and believe in you, bring you hope and reassurance during the difficult times!

    I am happy to report that after another intensive, restful break, my body is feeling as good as new and I am ready to begin a new chapter in my career; one which is based on principle that I will ‘train smarter and not harder’. I have learned through my setback and comeback that the key to success in endurance sport is CONSISTENCY. And the best way to achieve consistency is through smart training – which involves listening to your body, honoring its needs, and recovering as hard as you train. Success isn’t made in a day – it’s made in many weeks and months and years, which demands a continually healthy body. I believe that the mind has the capability of taking the body to new levels and defying past limitations, but I also know now that this is only possible if we work with our body rather than against it.

    Despite a year and a half of adversity, I am as motivated as ever and excited to get out there, train smart, push my body and achieve things on the track and roads that I never thought possible. Throughout this whole process, I have learned that being an elite endurance athlete is all about riding the peaks and the valleys that inevitably come with our sport. And like I said in the introduction of this article, that’s what I love most about the sport – It’s challenging and its tough, but the gratification you get from overcoming adversity and achieving your goals, most definitely outweighs the challenges.


    Ajay Kohli

    WINNER

    7 Systems Do More Contest from Mark Kennedy on Vimeo.

    Target Race: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure 5 km on Sunday, October 3, 2010.

    Target Time: 27:00

    TARGET RACE REPORT

    Ajay finished in a time of 21:19 not only exceeding the 7% improvement target but also shattering his 14% stretch target for an improvement of 27%!

    Congratulations to Ajay and the lifestyle transformation he has made.

    “Over the past year and a half I have shed over 75 lbs, made healthier lifestyle and dietary choices, as well as improved my race time by 27%. Without a doubt these choices and accomplishments have been fueled by my desire to set and achieve my goals.

    Wanting and desiring success is much different than just talking about it, you need to believe in it and then act on those beliefs. Believing in yourself is empowering. It also sets the tone necessary for you to be successful. Equally important, support mechanisms, be it people and or products can significantly accelerate and influence your progress.

    With that said, there are many factors that contribute to success. Setting goals, optimizing your experiences and meaningful use of your resources are extremely important. I’m thankful for 7 SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement, to JJ Neely and “Focus In Training” none of my successes would have been possible without their continual support and guidance. Thank you for your products and dedication!”

    AUGUST UPDATE

    Since starting 7 SYSTEMS I have seen a substantial increase in my training abilities. I have noticed this month that I am able to run, bike and swim harder. I have also noticed an increase in energy levels and weight loss. My training is more consistent and my training gains have increased. With the help of 7SYSTEMS I hope to acheive my goal at the Breast Cancer 5km run.

    JULY UPDATE

    Throughout the month of July, I believe my training has gone rather well. With the use of 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement I have found that I have the extra energy and endurance I need to complete my training. I have also been able to increase the number of training sessions I can do every week to help accomplish my goal of a 5km run in 27 minutes.

    ABOUT AJAY

    For the past 38 years I have lived my life with not a care in the world. During those years I engaged in an extremely unhealthy lifestyle that affected my daily life. I would usually smoke a pack of cigarettes a day, drink frequently and use food as a means of escape from every day stress. I started to notice deterioration in my health and a lack of energy. The total impact left me with no motivation to interact with my children at the end of the day. I looked old, felt old, and was almost 50 pounds overweight plus nothing felt right. I was heading down the road to Diabetes, heart condition and possible high blood pressure.  As of last July 2009 I decided to make some changes. I quit smoking cold turkey.  I also stopped drinking.  I started to watch what I ate and have now lost almost 50 pounds.  Most importantly I took up the sport of running. This has given me a whole new outlook on life and a determination to succeed. I have just completed my first Triathlon I and hope to compete in an Iron Man one day.  For my Target Race, I actually believe I can shatter my 5km race time of 29.03 not by 7%, but by 14%!  Failure is not an option.


    Adam Campbell- Sub 2:30 marathon runner

    adam22“So everyone is looking for the magic formula – how do I get faster and what can I take to improve my performance? The answer to these questions is easy.  Train more and train faster.

    However if you are going to buy into that little motto, then you need to make sure that you are recovering between sessions. I think it was the US marathoner and Olympic medalist Deena Kastor who said “there is no such thing as over-training, just under-recovering”. A key element to recovery is through diet. Anyone who tells you otherwise is an idiot. How could diet not affect performance? It is the building block for your cells, muscles, bones, blood…As a hard training athlete, you are also more likely to leach essential nutrients and minerals from your body as you stress the system.

    I have always enjoyed pursuing physical challenges, from Ironman racing to running marathons.  My new love and passion is mountain running. When I began training for the Jungfrau marathon, an uphill marathon with over 5000 feet of elevation gain, I knew that I would need improve my ability to recover if I was going to be able to handle the workload and stress of training for such an arduous event. I was fortunate enough to come across 7SYSTEMS at the beginning of my prep for this race and with the help of 7SYSTEMS I was able to complete my biggest run mileage ever, and proceeded to have the best ever finish by a Canadian at a mountain running world championships.

    So if you care about your health and you care about your performance 7SYSTEMS is more than worth a shot.”

    Adam Campbell is the 2007 Canadian Mountain Running Champion and has a 2:29 marathon personal best.  He is currently at law school studying to become a lawyer.

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    Ray Zahab- Ultramarathoner, Adventurer, Founder of impossible2Possible

    May 2011

    On November 1, 2006 former “pack a day smoker” Ray Zahab and two other runners set out on an epic expedition to cross the Sahara Desert by foot. One hundred and eleven days and 7500 kms  after leaving the coast of Senegal they completed their journey stepping into the Red Sea. The epic expedition had the trio running an average of 70km’s a day, without a single day of rest. National Geographic tracked this epic expedition by web, and the documentary film ‘Running The Sahara’ – produced by Matt Damon, directed by Academy Award winner James Moll – was filmed in an effort raise awareness for the drinking water crisis in Northern Africa.  After witnessing and experiencing the water crisis in northern Africa, Ray decided to leverage his future adventures to raising awareness and funding for causes that he supports and believes in. Running The Sahara would begin a journey of discovery- of learning that some of the largest barriers to success are the ones we put upon ourselves. Breaking these down, we can truly achieve extraordinary things.

    In 2007, Ray ran the three coastal trails of Canada, back to back and non-stop. The Akshayuk Pass on Baffin Island, East Coast Trail Newfoundland and West Coast Trail in British Columbia.

    Motivated by the Sahara run- Ray conceptualized the CanadaONExONE Run in May 2008. Along with a team of runners, Ray ran an average 80 kms per day in each of Canada’s 13 Provinces and Territories in so many days. Schools were visited, students participated, and communities became engaged in many of the child based issues  ONExONE is addressing. In Saskatoon alone, several thousand students and 27 schools were involved in school rallies and a city wide relay with Ray and the team.

    Two years after touching the Red Sea, Ray, and two other Canadians, broke the world speed record  for an unsupported expedition by a team to the South Pole, In the process, Ray trekked this traditional route from Hercules Inlet to the South Pole solely on foot and snowshoes- without the use of skis. Students and classrooms from all over North America joined the team as they trekked to the South Pole on a daily basis- communicating and actively taking part  in an educational resource– becoming “team mates” of the expedition.  This expedition was completed as part of Ray’s organization, impossible2Possible.

    In 2008, Ray founded impossible2Possible (i2P), an organization that aims to inspire and educate youth through adventure learning, and inclusion and participation in expeditions.

    Ray is a proud member of the board of Directors of the Ryan’s Well Foundation, is the official Athletic Ambassador and a board member of the ONExONE organization, and is a representative of SpreadTheNet.  Ray was the recipient of the ONExONE Difference Award in 2007, and the Torchbearers Award in 2010.

    Throughout 2009 and 2010, expeditions have included: an unsupported 13 day run the length of frozen Lake Baikal, 3 Youth based expeditions to Baffin Island, Tunisia and the Amazon. All of these expeditions supported various initiatives through an Experiential Learning program in which thousands of students participated as active team members during the expeditions, from classrooms all over the world.

    Ray has appeared multiple times in the media, including CNNi, The Hour, CBC, CTV, BBC, Jay Leno, Discovery, etc.

    In addition to his running adventures, Ray speaks around the world at events such as TED, IOC World Conference, Idea City, The Economist World in 2010 and 2011, World Affairs Council and countless major corporate events- spreading the message that we are all capable of the extraordinary in our lives and that in fact, the impossible is possible.

    August 2009 
    Ray has been using 7SYSTEMS to help him achieve some truly amazing adventures.  Always full of energy, he is an example of someone who is always striving to DO MORE.  Which is exactly why he is a member of the 7SYSTEMS 2010 Pro Team.  Below is his take on this year’s accomplishments and his answers to 7 Questions from 7SYSTEMS.
     
    “This year has been amazing. A 650+ km unsupported run across Lake Baikal in Siberia (in winter running an average of 50 kms per day!) and the impossible2possible RunningTunisia expedition in which 4 Youth Ambassadors ran 260+ kms through sandstorms, searing heat and endless dunes.
    The Ambassadors recorded their experiences by video which CNN then used to broadcast updates twice a day! Even more amazing…they communicated LIVE to close to 10 000 students that tracked their daily progress using the latest technology-and the students in classrooms participated in an Experiential Learning Program based on the topic of water.  The students in the schools following have raised close to  $20 000 for water projects in Africa!”
     
    Check out the video journals in the Experience the Run section of www.runningtunisia.com
     
     

     

    February 2009
    canada-at-south-pole“I’ve completed many multi-week expeditions before but I have never recovered as well, day after day, as I did on my way to the South Pole. 7SYSTEMS was integral in providing our bodies with the support they needed to complete this grueling expedition.”

    In December 2008, three world-class adventurers, including ultra-runner Ray Zahab, legendary arctic explorer Richard Weber, and elite adventurer Kevin Vallely began a self-supported trek from Hercules Inlet to the Geographic South Pole; a distance of over 1,100km. With an existing record of 39 days and a goal of 40 days, they dragged sleds weighing over 170 pounds (73 kilograms) each, and arrived at the Pole on January 6th, 2009 in a new record time of 33 days 23 hours and 55 minutes. Their choice of supplement: 7SYSTEMS endurance sport supplement. Ray Zahab is a world renowned ultra marathon runner and adventurer. His story is as compelling as the adventures he undertakes.

    www.southpolequest.com

    7 Questions from 7SYSTEMS

    1. What accomplishment are you most proud of in your sporting career?

    RZ: The day I finished my first impossible2Possible Youth Expedition…to see young adventurers do and complete an expedition that very few people would attempt was incredible! I am also very proud of each of the expeditions I have been fortunate to complete- from running all 3 of Canada’s coastal trails back to back, to running across the entire Sahara, from west coast to east coast of Africa.

    2. What is the best advice anyone has ever given you?

    RZ: Whenever I have a bad day or start feeling sorry for myself to remember that guaranteed someone is having a much more difficult time then me. In other words, never lose appreciation for what I am so fortunate to do day to day.

    3. What motivates you to get up every day and kick your own ass?

    RZ: There are several factors. I do love to challenge myself and push my limits, but lately on expeditions such as Siberia, the difficulty of the conditions and the running are insane. With very little sleep, frigid conditions and exhausted body, i am still so-o-o pumped at the end of each day on an expedition to fire up the BGAN and communicate with the students. They inspire me!

    4. Who is the person you look up to most and why?

    RZ: Again, many people. Some of note… Phil Fontaine, Senator Romeo Dallaire, Marshall Ulrich, Richard Weber, Lisa Smith. These are all people with conviction and dedication to what they believe in- and in my opinion are pioneers.  

    5. If you were stranded on an island what book would you want to have with you?

    RZ: Celebrating Inuit Art 1948-1970 with assorted essays by folks like Anne Hanson. It would be my piece of Canada.

    6. What’s your favorite unhealthy snack?

    RZ: Potato Chips, burgers, pizza, poutine…help, I can’t stop!

    7. What is the best restaurant you’ve ever been too and what did you eat there?

    RZ: Some funky little place in a small community in Mali halfway across Running the Sahara that had chicken. First chicken i ate in 50 days, and it was awesome!

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    Linda Wagar

    linda-marathon1“In January 2008, I had an opportunity to try a product that is meant to help endurance athletes.  I have a body type that has a few issues, and I was intrigued by how this supplement was different from others, and how it might be of help to me.  My approach has always been preventative. When I set a goal, I like to achieve it, and feeding my body what it needs, and preventing issues is a fine balance. I had not run long distances in 2 years, and with my plans to run a marathon in May and a 50K endurance run in July, nutrition would have to be a priority in my life. As fate would have it, my diet was not the best in April & May.  My training surprisingly went quite well. I know the supplements helped me not only with stamina but with my recovery.  I was able to go beyond my physical limits, and the realization that there was no residual pain, no inflammation, and very little tightness.  This was my reward: in July I turned 50K into 53K and felt like I had gone for a nice long 6 ½ hour run. I attribute this to taking 7 Systems.

    I recommend it for high performance athletes or for runners, like myself, who wish to make nutrition a priority no matter what sport they choose to embrace. My 51 year old body thanked me for taking in 7 Systems and rewarded me with a performance which was beyond my expectations. This former couch potato is happy and I can only imagine what I could do if I was disciplined enough to take them religiously every single day.”

    Linda Rainville Wagar
    Ottawa, Ontario
    linda@lindawagar.com
    www.CanadianMarathonStories.ca

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    Anthea Seeton

    “I have taken the product and I really loved it.  I found out about it on line while preparing for a 30 day Bikram challenge.  All my fellow yogis had all sorts of cramping, stiffness, etc., that thanks to 7SYSTEMS I didn’t suffer from.  I am off to do teacher training in Palm Desert for 9 weeks and decided instead of putting together my own supplement program that I would take the 7 systems.   I don’t take it all the time, but for those times when I am pounding my body it is amazing.”


    Andrea Perego

    andrea-perego-run_2“I began taking 7Systems when I was determined to make the most of my recovery time between two Ironman races and I have been taking them ever since.  I am not the fastest or the fittest triathlete out there, and despite my coach’s best efforts, I don’t always do my workouts the way I am supposed to.  I have been known to stack hard workout on top of hard workout and fill my days off with things like squash or just running around trying to get a thousand things done at once.  Despite all that, I still recover quickly and am ready for the next workout.  And I just don’t get sick.  I travel now and then for work and it is so easy to take along.  You just can’t argue with all of that.

    Thanks for making a great product that is so easy to use.   I am a believer.”

    Andrea is an accomplished age-groupers who juggle straining with her busy job on Bay Street in Torono.


    Jasper Blake- Ironman Champion

    jasper-on-bike

    “At the heart of it I believe the only way to get better is to train harder and smarter than everyone else and not get injured. To be honest, I usually stay clear of supplements but 7SYSTEMS has created a product that is worth using. Prior to Ironman Canada I incorporated 7SYSTEMS into my nutritional arsenal and it helped me get through one of the toughest training regimens of my career. 7SYSTEMS is a great product. It’s easy to use and takes the guess work out of my nutrition.”

    Jasper Blake, Winner, 2006 Ironman Canada

    www.jasperblake.com

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    Lucy Smith- 19 Time National Champion

    “I can honestly say that energy and recovery is a pretty big deal for me. I do most of my training in the morning and then I am on the go for the rest of the day with no down time. I think that the supplement has really benefited me. There are certainly no negative side effects and I feel that my recovery has been really good and my training and racing has been very strong since starting on the supplement in April ‘07.”

     

    Lucy Smith is a 19-Time Canadian Champion and internationally ranked athlete in triathlon, duathlon, and distance running.  She is also the mother of two.


    Rich Pady – Ironman/Coach

    pady-success-story“I started using 7 Systems about 4 months ago to keep my health in balance while I juggled the rest of my life. I’m a father of two young kids, I have coaching company, a personal training company and, oh I almost forgot, I was training for Ironman USA. After a winter of many colds and feeling run down I started using 7 Systems and since then I’m happy to say I have not had a cold. I feel stronger and more energized than in the past 4 years. In the past when my kids were up a lot at night it would hurt my training the next day but since starting 7 Systems I did many big training days on 4-6 hours of broken sleep. It was amazing how it helped to keep my body going and healthy and I love how easy and convenient it is to use. I’ve been in the sport of triathlon now for 20 years and I’m finding since being on 7 Systems my body is recovering better than ever before. I had a great race in Ironman USA and I am already back to training. I will not hesitate to recommend 7 Systems to all my athletes.”

    Richard Pady is the Head Coach of Healthy Results Training.  He leads dozens of athletes to personal victories every year and has a firm grasp on what it takes to achieve your personal best having been a 3 time member of Canada’s national triathlon team and the overall winner of over 50 multi-sport events.  Richard is also the founder for Race4kids, a not for profit initiative to raise money for kids battling cancer.  Richard and his wife Heather are the proud parents of two.

     

    www.healthyresults.ca

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    Brad Cunningham – Ultra Marathoner

    brad-in-water“The reason we train is to see if we can be better than our former self. In order to be better we need to do things differently than we have done before. For me, that was moving beyond just running all the time. I started to pay attention to the details that affect performance, like diet and recovery. 7SYSTEMS helped me become better.  I found the world of supplements to be confusing and expensive. The 7SYSTEMS team made that world simple for me. Everything I need is in one packet – simple, portable, and smart. Now I’m getting everything my body needs in order to be better than it was before, while saving money at the same time.  What I like about 7SYSTEMS is that it’s designed by athletes. These are people who have done what it is I am trying to do, and they have found a way to simplify the confusing world of supplements.   One packet per day, that’s it! And everything is covered.   The difference between average and good is training.   The difference between good and great is details. 7SYSTEMS has helped me take care of the details.”
    Brad Cunningham is an ultra-runner, coach and teacher.


    Jordan Rapp- Ironman- Top Triathlon Cyclist

    Measuring the efficacy of vitamins is a funny thing. It’s not like caffeine, where the effect is immediate, but short lived. The idea is that you want to slightly raise the overall functioning of your body consistently. Over the past month, I completed two and a half weeks of the most intense training I’ve ever done, in preparation for Ironman Arizona. I started taking 7Systems at the same time. During that time period, I had to occasional “off day,” as we all do, but I felt like I consistently recovered more quickly than I had in the past when taking on this sort of load, and as a result I was able to perform better during my key workout sessions. I believe that 7Systems was a definitive part of that. The convenience of not having to remember to take a variety of supplements was also very helpful; that may seem like a small thing, but simply having one packet that you open and take to get everything you need makes a difference when you have a lot going on.

     

    Jordan Rapp is well known for his popular cycling and bike fit advice on the internet chat forum Slowtwitch, and has compiled 5 top 3 overall finishes at Ironman events in the past 3 years.


    Mental Preparation- Stefan Timms

    Mentally Preparing for the Early Season Races

    By Stefan Timms

    Some call it the winter coma.  Others call it hibernation.  Whatever term you choose to use, clearing the mental cobwebs that are associated with training through the winter can be difficult.  Early season races allow us the opportunity to do a mental spring-cleaning of sorts.  They allow us the chance to regain our technical race skills (i.e. transitions), to build up some fitness at race intensity, and to set up a successful triathlon season.  It is important be realistic in your approach to the early season and use it for what it is – a tune-up.

    Many people emerge from winter having completed a solid aerobic training block.  The base miles they have done have them feeling fit and wanting to test themselves.  This is a great mindset to have, and physically these people are in a great place as well.  Others used the winter for feasting and hanging with the family, and the early season races mean something entirely different for them.  However, no matter where your fitness is at, there are some basic strategies you can use to mentally prepare for the early season races.

    * Don’t leave anything to chance on race day.  Make sure that you aware what is required for the race and have it ready the night before the race, if not a few days before (i.e. race gear, registration, race kit pick up).  Reduce the race to just racing.  Remove any unneeded stress from race day so that you are able to focus all your energy on the task at hand.

    * Rehearse your race day plan before the race so that when you arrive you are able to go through the motions with little thought.  Eat the same breakfast that you eat, get to the race site the same amount of time before the race, follow the same routine.  This all should have been practiced in the weeks and months leading up to the race so that you feel comfortable going through the whole process.

    * Be positive about yourself and your upcoming race.  The words you choose to use and think should be positive so that you are energized about racing.  Take some time in the months and weeks leading into the race to visualize you completing the race the way you want it to occur. Knowing the course is a huge advantage so that you can see it as you race it in your mind.  On race day you will feel as though you have done this before and you will achieve the result you know can achieve.

    * Do whatever you need to do put yourself in the mental state you need to be in for the race.  If you require loud music, then wear a Walkman.  If you require solitude, then seek it out prior to the race.  It is your race and you need to do what is best for you to create your own positive race environment.  On race day it is ok to be selfish.  You know what you need, to do what is necessary to get you ready to race.

    * Be aware that the unexpected always occurs on race day and be prepared for it.  Have three extras tubes for your bike instead of one.  Have extra food in case you get caught in a line up.  Have water accessible. Think about the possibilities of the uncontrollable, and try to prepare for them.  If something you hadn’t considered occurs, then deal with it, but don’t let it affect your mental state. You control your mindset.

    The first race of the year can be a little hectic as we all try to remember the things that made us successful last season.  The most important thing to realize is that we are all rusty.  Nobody comes back from a not racing for a few months and is perfect.  And rarely does the person who wins the first race of the year also win the most important race of the year later that summer.  Early season races need to be approached differently than those that hold more importance.  The success of the race should not be determined by the outcome of the results, but rather based on the achievement of predetermined goals for the race.  Tune up your mental skills, as well your physical ones, and learn about racing.  This will set you up for a successful season.


    Peter Oyler

    oyler“Training for the RACE ACROSS AMERICA (RAAM) required that I spend an incredible amount of hours on the bike in order to make sure I was super comfortable with my bike. With week after week of high volume training and some intensity, I needed to supplement my vitamin and mineral needs. 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement made a noticeable difference in so many areas for me. It is a great supplement for those who have great nutritional habits and for especially for someone like me who is always on the fly and not a great cook! Our bodies need what 7SYSTEMS provides in order to keep going strong mile after mile.”

    Peter Oyler finished 8th overall in the 2007 RACE ACROSS AMERICA.  He has started training for training for the 2009 race again.

    www.peteroyler.com

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    Mike Greenburg

    mike-greenberg“I must admit I was skeptical at first about the product but after about three weeks of using it I started to notice that I had higher energy levels (especially in the morning) and my recovery between workouts had greatly improved. However what really convinced me is when I ran out and was off the product for a couple of weeks. I became much more tired and was not recovering from workouts as well as before.. Now I am back on the product and feel great. I think because I have a hectic work schedule and don’t always eat properly; the product has been an important complement to my training and general well being. To me the ease of use of the product is a big advantage. I would highly recommend this product to anyone.”
    Mike Greenberg was 3rd overall at the 2007 National Amateur Triathlon Championships and 1st at the 2008 Championships.  He is also an Investment Banker and soon to be father.


    Jonathan Moncreiff

    “Having taken several years off from competitive running and triathlons, I found that returning to competition and the fitness level I desired was not as easy or as straightforward as I would have hoped. In short, although the mind was willing, time had taken its toll on my body. While getting through the mandated workouts was possible, recovery did come as quickly as before and as a result it took longer to make the desired progression.  Moreover, whereas I could once focus much of my energy on my fitness pursuits (be it workouts, rest, dietary requirements, etc.), today’s reality is that I have many different and competing interests for my time. Each day only has 24 hours in it and I, much like most people I know, frequently find it difficult to get done (both work and training related) what I would like to before I need to get to bed to be rested enough to face the next day.  Thus, faced with these new challenges, it became evident that if I wanted to meet my lofty fitness goals, I was going to need to be smart about my training. Luckily, it was at about this time that I discovered 7SYSTEMS. Since starting to use 7SYSTEMS, I have noticed both increased energy levels (specifically when I wake up) and that my recovery is accelerated (both crucial elements in my book). The fact that all my supplement needs can be met in one product is also a huge advantage. Gone are the days of having to purchase, organize and carry around multiple individual supplement products. I highly recommend this product.”
    Jonathan Moncrieff: Corporate Lawyer; Competitive Runner and Triathlete