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Incredible Medal Success in London 2012

 

Of the ten 7SYSTEMS athletes who competed in the London Olympics, an incredible 30% medaled. 

We are so proud to have helped them to the podium with 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement.  They are:

  • Silver: Adam van Koeverden
  • Bronze: Gillian Carleton
  • Silver: Malcolm Howard

 

 

There were lots of stories, pain, tears, joy and victory for all of the athletes.  They all have stories to share and are such great examples of people who have a passion to DO MORE.  Thanks to all of them for being such an inspiration regardless of the outcome you achieved. 

Follow the full story of the athletes at http://www.facebook.com/DoMoreWith7systems 


Ron Slack- Escape from Alcatraz race report from WIN MORE STUFF Winner

THANK YOU to 7SYSTEMS for the opportunity to run in San Francisco.

It was definitely a check mark on the bucket list which I would do it again. On race day the water temps that I was worried about were gone once in the water. It was a different way to start a swim most definitely (jumping off a boat). As most, I found the bike course very challenging due to the hills and sharp turns on the bottom of some. Which limited the speed one could obtain on the back side. The run was the most fun for me with the beach run and sand stairs. I will take all the ups and downs of this race and use them for  the next, which is next weekend here in Edmonton and then on to Ironman Canada.


Run Economy & Resistance Training

By Megan Brown

As runners, our main goal is to get the finish line as fast as we can and in most cases, ahead of as many people as possible. To achieve this goal, we set up complex training plans which include: long runs, shorter aerobic runs, tempo/threshold intervals, speed intervals and hill repeats.

 

Now, what if I told you that you could also get faster by investing some extra time in ‘NON-running’ workouts?

 

No, I am not referring to hitting the pool or jumping on your bike! I am suggesting that you can get faster as a runner by hitting the gym for strength and resistance training.

 

You have probably heard many times that RESISTANCE TRAINING can improve run performance. Some cite reasons such as ‘increased strength’ or ‘increased power’ or even ‘fatigue resistance’ for improved performance. Although many of these outcomes do lead to performance enhancement, resistance training, if done properly, has the most profound impact on performance because of its effect on run economy.

 

RUN ECONOMY is formally defined as the amount of oxygen consumed to run a given speed for a given distance. To illustrate: Erin may require 49ml of oxygen to run a 4:30 km, while it may cost Wes 54ml of oxygen to run his 4:30 km, making him ‘less economical’. With all things being equal, who do you expect to get to the finish line first? I bet you wish you were Erin!

 

You can also understand this concept by comparing your body to a car, and oxygen to gas; the more economical your car, the less gas you require to get from A to B at a given speed. And since gas (oxygen) is one of the limiting factors of performance, you want be as economical as possible.

 

Interestingly, most recreational (and even professional) runners loose a great deal of economy through their RUN MECHANICS. Below are some of the more common mechanical flaws:

  1. Hip instability
  2. Slow foot contact time
  3. Poor hamstring activation
  4. Insufficient knee drive

Therefore, a sound (run-specific) strength and resistance program that focuses on improving hip & core strength, foot contract time, hamstring activation and knee drive will inevitably make you a faster, more economical runner.

Below are examples of exercises that might be seen in such a program:

1)     Hip raise with hip abduction against resistance

– lie on you back, knees bent and feet firmly planted on the ground with resistance band around your knees

– raise your hips forming an incline bridge while pushing your knees out against resistance

*Start with 1 set of 12, move to 2 sets of 12-10 then 3 sets of 12-10-8

2)   Plank on swiss ball – “Stir the pot”

– form a plank on your elbows on a medium sized swiss ball

– contract your core while ensuring the integrity of your back stays strong

– use your forearms to ‘stir’ the swiss ball to the right and then to left while keep plank stable

* Start with 1 sets of 6xeach way; 2 sets of 6x each way; 3 sets of 6x each way 

3)     Hip raise with single straight leg

–        Lie on your back with your left knee bent and foot firm planted on the ground and right leg straight on the ground

–        Raise your hip (as in #1) while keeping your right leg straight; focus on leading the movement with your right leg so that your right hip is parallel with left hip and the end of the movement

–        Lower hip (and right leg) + repeat

–        To add a challenge, you can have the foot of your bent leg on a medicine ball creating an unstable surface

*Start with 1 set of 12x each leg then 2sets of 12xeach leg + 10xeach leg

4)     Running A’s against resistance 

–        Anchor a strong looped resistance band around a stable pole or piece of equipment  

–        With your back to equipment and the resistance band at waist level, run as hard as you can forward against the resistance

–        If done properly, the resistance band should keep you running in one spot despite your efforts to power forward

–        Continue to lean slightly forward and drive your knees, executing a perfect running motion

–        5-8 sets of 10sec; powerful running with high knees and perfect body condition

Thanks Megan Brown for providing us with this awesome article about run economy. Megan is a multiple-time Canadian cross country running champion and the current Canadian 1/2 marathon championShe coaches a wide array of runners in Toronto as part of MB Performance and can be reached at megan.brown2012@gmail.com


Cyclocross Season

It’s that time of year again; the season between summer and winter when bike riding temporarily loses it’s identity. It’s a tricky time of year. The weather can be all over the place, North American road and triathlon races are by and large finished and it’s hard to know what kind of bike you are supposed to ride or whether you are supposed to ride at all.

Your road bike is a bit of a prima donna; it likes warm weather, clean streets and the energy of a good group. Your tri bike is even more of a snob, craving long open stretches of road in the blazing sun, you can’t even think about taking that out in the fall months without serious attitude. Your mountain bike is always eager to go out but it craves the trail networks, some mud and a few decent jumps. Granted the fall months are great for this but what if you just want to get out and do some long consistent riding?

Well there is a solution and it’s the cyclocross bike. Yes it’s totally fine to justify the purchase of yet another bike. If you already have three then why not four? Four is a nice round number if you’re a cyclist. You cover off all your conceivable bases unless of course you live in a city whereby you will probably need to purchase a really cool cruiser bike for those trendy jaunts about town.

Cyclocross has grown significantly in North America over the past few years. A good example is a small weekly race series here in Victoria that started several years ago with attendance around 15 people. Now there are close to 100 people ever week who race around various parks in town as the sun is setting on cool fall evenings.

Cyclocross offers the perfect balance between road riding and mountain biking and is ideal for semi off road adventures. Cross bikes typically take the shape of a normal road bike with a few small tweaks including a higher bottom bracket for greater clearance and tires that literally cross between road and mountain. Similar to a road bike, they are thin but with small treads like a mountain bike.

The main benefits to riding a cross bike at this time of year are numerous. You can access any type of road or bike path or just stay on the road. You won’t be moving as fast as when you are on a road bike so generally cooler conditions don’t affect you as much. Cross bikes generally have more clearance for fenders which is a good thing if you are planning on doing a fair bit on the road in wet conditions. In places like Victoria where we ride all winter most people are on cross bikes for this reason.

Cross bikes are typically cost effective unless you are fanatic about the component group you chose to run. Usually the frames are a little heavier and the components are not so high end so you can get into it for about a thousand dollars, which is not bad in todays often high-priced bike world. If you are really thrifty you will realize that your cross bike can essentially be transformed into a road bike with a $50 tire change and voila you’ve got a bike for all seasons.

So if you are sitting there thinking of all kinds of lame excuses why you can’t ride this fall why not dig into the cross scene? Most bike companies have cross bikes in their line up at very reasonable prices. Who knows, you’ll probably venture out onto some roads you would never dare touch with your road or triathlon bike. Have fun!


Will Omega-3 Fish Oil Help the Immune System?- By Larry L. Taylor

Omega-3 fatty acid fish oil can boost the immune system especially when taken with the correct multi-nutrient supplement. Let me explain what I mean.

What the Immune System Does

The immune system of the human body consists of many organs, including the skin, proteins within the bloodstream, cells and tissues. Its function is to prevent diseases, infections and tumors. Yet, for a variety of reasons, it does not always work as it should. A variety of nutritional supplements can be used to promote healthy immune system function. One of them is fish oil, because of the omega-3 fatty acids it contains.

In immunodeficiency diseases, the body cannot fight off disease or infection. These diseases are life threatening and require, lifestyle and pharmaceutical interventions, as well as nutritional support, if the patient is to survive.

Autoimmune diseases are much more common. In these diseases, the immune system attacks healthy cells, in the same way that it would attack an invading pathogen. Some of the most common autoimmune diseases include rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. But, chronic inflammation plays a role in many other diseases, some of which are life-threatening.

 

Inflammation & Fish Oil

Inflammation is a natural immune system response to infection. Injured or infected cells release eicosanoids and cytokines. These are the molecules that cause redness and swelling. But, in many cases, they are present in the bloodstream when there is no infection; no reason for inflammation.

 

Here’s why fish oil is beneficial.

1) Inflammation Affects Joints, Arteries, Heart…

Omega-3 fatty acids are converted within the body into anti-inflammatory molecules, while omega-6s are converted to inflammatory ones. Most people get too many omega6s in the diet and not enough omega-3s. So, inflammation is negatively affecting their joints and arteries, as well as all of the cells of the body. Chronic inflammation is even a factor that supports the growth of cancerous tumors. A good fish oil supplement can help restore the balance, support the joints and arteries, prevent cancer and heart disease.

2) Allergies, Asthma, Dermatitis…

Studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for preventing allergies, asthma and other types of hypersensitivities. Hypersensitivity is similar to an autoimmune disease, in that it is an inappropriate response to a non-toxic substance. Dermatitis (itchy and inflamed skin) is a type of hypersensitivity.

 

Fish Oil & Multi-Nutrient Supplement- Powerful Combination

People that frequently have colds, upper respiratory infections, influenza or other common illnesses have a poorly functioning immune system. This may be due to an underlying illness. But, it is often due to inadequate nutritional intake. Fish oil provides the necessary omega-3 fatty acids, but alone is not enough to reduce the risk of catching a cold or the flu. All of the essential vitamins and minerals, as well as trace elements and cofactors are needed for the body to prevent viruses from replicating and causing an infection.

 

Use Distilled Fish Oil ONLY

All fish oil supplements should be molecularly distilled. Otherwise they are likely to contain contaminants, such as mercury and cancer-causing dioxins. The percentage of omega-3 fatty acids in a supplement, as well as the type, varies from one fish species to another. Manufacturers should list the amount of each omega3 that the supplement provides somewhere on the label.

It may be necessary to do a little research in order to be sure that the oils are molecularly distilled. But, if you want the benefits to your immune system, you should take the time to do the research. The good news is that I have done that. Please see my website listed below for more information on the benefits of fish oil. Thanks, Larry L. Taylor

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Larry_L._Taylor


Kevin White

Age…37
Occupation…Firefighter Captain
Sport…Triathlon (completed 2 Ironman distance races in 2009 but currently focusing on the half Ironman distance)
 
“A couple of months ago when I was sitting around after a training session with some of my triathlon friends talking about what’s new or hot in supplements, one of my friends mentioned the amazing results they were getting from 7 Systems and suggested I try it.  I was complaining about feeling lethargic and having trouble waking up in the morning and therefore not pushing through my workouts with the appropriate effort.  I went to the website and checked it out including reading some of the testimonials.  It sounded like the right product for me…so I went ahead and ordered a supply.  After a couple of months taking 7SYSTEMS I wake up earlier, with more energy and definitely don’t feel lethargic anymore.  I am getting WAY more out of my training sessions and continue to have increased stamina and speed.
 
I work as a career Firefighter Captain and parent a very supportive daughter (Jessica 13 years old).  Over the past several years I have competed in dozens of triathlons from sprints to Ironmans but find the Ironman 70.3 distance best suits my lifestyle.   
 
I raced the second half of my season while taking 7SYSTEMS and had personal bests in all disciplines of the half ironman distance…including taking a full 13 mins off my half marathon run split.  I reached my season goal and qualified for the 70.3 World Championships in Clearwater which is coming up November 13th.  Thanks to 7SYSTEMS I can definitely DO MORE!!”

Post Ironman 70.3 World Championships.

After a tough swim in the ocean, Kevin hammered on the bike at nearly a 37 kmph average pace for his fastest bike leg ever.  That set him up a run that kept him on pace.  He ended up beating his goal with a finishing time of 4:58!


Ajay Kohli

WINNER

7 Systems Do More Contest from Mark Kennedy on Vimeo.

Target Race: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure 5 km on Sunday, October 3, 2010.

Target Time: 27:00

TARGET RACE REPORT

Ajay finished in a time of 21:19 not only exceeding the 7% improvement target but also shattering his 14% stretch target for an improvement of 27%!

Congratulations to Ajay and the lifestyle transformation he has made.

“Over the past year and a half I have shed over 75 lbs, made healthier lifestyle and dietary choices, as well as improved my race time by 27%. Without a doubt these choices and accomplishments have been fueled by my desire to set and achieve my goals.

Wanting and desiring success is much different than just talking about it, you need to believe in it and then act on those beliefs. Believing in yourself is empowering. It also sets the tone necessary for you to be successful. Equally important, support mechanisms, be it people and or products can significantly accelerate and influence your progress.

With that said, there are many factors that contribute to success. Setting goals, optimizing your experiences and meaningful use of your resources are extremely important. I’m thankful for 7 SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement, to JJ Neely and “Focus In Training” none of my successes would have been possible without their continual support and guidance. Thank you for your products and dedication!”

AUGUST UPDATE

Since starting 7 SYSTEMS I have seen a substantial increase in my training abilities. I have noticed this month that I am able to run, bike and swim harder. I have also noticed an increase in energy levels and weight loss. My training is more consistent and my training gains have increased. With the help of 7SYSTEMS I hope to acheive my goal at the Breast Cancer 5km run.

JULY UPDATE

Throughout the month of July, I believe my training has gone rather well. With the use of 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement I have found that I have the extra energy and endurance I need to complete my training. I have also been able to increase the number of training sessions I can do every week to help accomplish my goal of a 5km run in 27 minutes.

ABOUT AJAY

For the past 38 years I have lived my life with not a care in the world. During those years I engaged in an extremely unhealthy lifestyle that affected my daily life. I would usually smoke a pack of cigarettes a day, drink frequently and use food as a means of escape from every day stress. I started to notice deterioration in my health and a lack of energy. The total impact left me with no motivation to interact with my children at the end of the day. I looked old, felt old, and was almost 50 pounds overweight plus nothing felt right. I was heading down the road to Diabetes, heart condition and possible high blood pressure.  As of last July 2009 I decided to make some changes. I quit smoking cold turkey.  I also stopped drinking.  I started to watch what I ate and have now lost almost 50 pounds.  Most importantly I took up the sport of running. This has given me a whole new outlook on life and a determination to succeed. I have just completed my first Triathlon I and hope to compete in an Iron Man one day.  For my Target Race, I actually believe I can shatter my 5km race time of 29.03 not by 7%, but by 14%!  Failure is not an option.


Luke Ehgoetz

FINALIST

Target Race: Muskoka 70.3 on September 12, 2010

Taget Time: 4:40

TARGET RACE REPORT

First of all, let’s get one thing straight.  This race should be called the Muskoka 72.8, since the bike course is actually 94K instead of the usual 90.   As a result, you certainly get your money’s worth doing this race.

So essentially, my whole summer was geared up towards doing this race.   I had several shorter tri’s and a few longer distance ones, which all worked well as training for this race.

So let’s get into it shall we?   
The days leading up to this event were a bit nerving, as a lot of people (myself included) spent a fair bit of time watching the weather reports.   The weather trend was very cool mornings and they were calling for light rain most of the day.   Rain on this bike course can be treacherous, due to the tight turns and hilly course.   In 2008 when I did this event, it rained most of the day, but at least it was warm.    10 or 11 degrees and rain was not going to be fun.  

In previous years, I went up with my family on Friday and attended the athlete banquet which was always very good.   A great way to carbo load for the race.  This year, the family stayed at home (hockey try-outs and questionable weather) and I came up with another athlete I know from New Dundee, Greg Hallman (who by the way did awesome in his first ever half iron distance event – congrats Greg!!).   I picked Greg up at home at 6am, and we made great time getting to Muskoka just before 10am with a couple of quick coffee and restroom stops.

We were staying at Hidden Valley, which is nice and close to Dearhurst, and it allows us to keep our vehicle with us (as opposed to the airport parking for Dearhurst guests).   Upon arriving, we checked in (YES!! our room was ready at 10am!), so we put our bags into the room and then proceeded to walk our bikes to the bike check-in at Dearhurst parking lot.   From there, it was onto registration, a tour of the race expo, a quick walk around the swim start and exit, and then we headed to the Power Bar Pro Panel question and answer session that they put on.   Like last year, many of the top pro’s were there to answer questions, including 2x Kona champ Craig Alexander and last years Kona runner up, Mirinda Carfrae (also both winners of this race last year).  

5:20am Sunday morning, alarm goes off, and I am happy to have woken up after a pretty solid night’s sleep.   I quickly ate some oatmeal and a whole wheat wrap with peanut butter and a banana rolled up inside.   After a bit of coffee, my 7 systems supplements and some packing up, we were out of HV by 6:15 and walking in the dark over to Deerhurst.  Saturday was a great day weather wise, and likely everyone wished we had that weather for Sunday.   As it turns out, most of the rain passed by overnight, and we were greeted race morning with overcast skies and what seemed like a comfortable 13 or 14 degrees.   It didn’t really feel cold at all.   It was almost “ideal” racing conditions…almost!
We arrived in transition and I quickly got to work taking all of the wet bags off my bike and then getting everything set up.   After an easy run to get warmed up, I started putting on my wetsuit for the long walk to the swim start.   Once there, I did a good warm-up, and was ready for this race to get started.   I felt calm and comfortable, and before we knew it, the Canadian national anthem ended, and the pro’s were off and running (actually swimming….but you know what I mean!).  I was in wave 2, which was a good thing, as that would mean little traffic to negotiate in the middle parts of the swim.   4 minutes later, and the horn went off, and it was game on!   

1.9K Swim

I don’t know if it was me, or what, but I thought the swim course was slightly different than the prior two years.   The course is normally a perfect rectangle, but this year, it seemed like we had to take a bit of a left hand turn at the first buoy, right beside a bunch of boats.   This made for a bit of congestion in the swim, likely the most I have ever experienced in this race.   I got a bit knocked around, hit, pushed and slapped, but nothing I haven’t experienced before.   I tried to just find some open space, and after a few minutes I was pretty much OK and swimming free and clear.   After the right turn at the 2nd buoy, I was more or less just trying to hold a nice steady pace and try to find some feet to draft off of as much as I could.   I did a bit of drafting here and there, but likely swam most of the race on my own.   Nothing else was too memorable about this part, and 34 minutes later, I exited the water.   Ideally, I was hoping to go 33 minutes in the swim, but 34 was definitely alright, and a 4 minute improvement over last year.    After the swim exit, I took advantage of the wetsuit strippers which is definitely a good idea, and also decided to slip on a pair of runners for the 300m UPHILL run to the transition zone.   Once in T1, I quickly got my helmet and clear sunglasses on and was off on the bike.   It was warm enough that gloves and arm warmers or an extra shirt was not required (for me at least).

94K Bike

With the 1.9K swim and 300m uphill run to transition, my heart rate was high right off the bat.   The first 20K of the bike course is definitely not easy.   A lot of steep rolling hills to keep that heart rate pumping.  At this stage, I was passing a lot of people from my wave, as I was only 28th in my AG on the swim.   This was motivating, and kept me pushing hard.   Once we got on the main roads of Hwy 35, it was time to push the pace.   The roads were freshly paved, overcast, no wind and cool.   Perfect biking weather.   I was making good time here and the average speed kept going up.
My nutrition plan on the bike was as follows:
– Start off with a normal concentrate (260 calories) of Infinite in my aero drink bottle;
– Carry a double concentrate (520 calories) of Infinite in a bottle on my frame;
– After the aero drink is empty, put the 2x concentrate bottle in my aero drink bottle and pick up 1 water at each aid station to last the rest of the race;
– I also grabbed one gel at each aid station to give me that little extra bit of calories;

This plan worked well and I had no issues with it at all.

The middle 35 or 40K of the bike course went by really fast.   I found myself going back and forth with two other athletes, which kept things interesting.   After the 2nd aid station down in Baysville, things started to get tougher.   Firstly, it started to rain.   Not too heavy, but enough to get the roads wet and slippery in the most difficult and technical part of the course.   At this point, I found myself all alone.   A few of the guys I was riding with got ahead of me and joined up with another small pack.   For 15 or 20K, I struggled to catch back up with them, as I really wanted to be with a group, rather than all by myself.   I’d say with 15K to go, I got passed by Chris Van Kooten who started in a wave (or two or three) behind me.   For some reason after he passed me, it helped pull me along (no drafting of course) and we caught up to the pack of guys I was trying to catch for the last half hour.   Chris carried on, and left us all, but I was now back with the group of other riders, which really helped.   To my surprise, one of the riders in this pack was Jeff Beech, a former pro triathlete from Waterloo, where I am from (more or less anyway).   That was super motivating, as he is in my AG.   If you would have said I would be going into T2 with Jeff Beech at the beginning of the race, I would have said you were crazy.   That being said, we all rode together for the final 5K of the ride and as we approached T2, I had a nice smooth dismount, and I actually beat him over the dismount line, and was likely in about 3rd place in my AG at this point, making up 25 spots over the 94K bike.

Into T2 though however, that would be the last I would see of Jeff.  He is an awesome runner, and with his quick transition, he was gone.   I took some extra time to put my Garmin watch on to track my pace, socks on my feet to avoid any blisters and then grab my Nathan Speed belt, for extra nutrition for the run.   I think this added 15 or 20 seconds over Jeff’s time, so by the time I got out to the road, he was already 100m ahead and gaining ground quickly!

21.1K Run

So although I didn’t really know it at this point, I think I was in 4th place in my AG starting the run, as Jeff Beech took over 3rd in T2 and eventually would end up in 2nd.   Right off the bat at the 1K marker, we had to climb a pretty decent hill on the run.   I could totally feel my quads starting to tighten up, which made me nervous.   I don’t think it was nutrition, but purely the effort put out on the bike.   I quickly took another salt pill, and hoped all would get better once we hit some of the “flatter” sections on Hwy 60.   Once there, things seemed to get better and I was ticking along at a nice pace.   I got passed by only a few runners, and I past a few, so things were staying pretty even.  Starting at about the 8K mark, things got tough on the run.   We had a few good climbs to get to 9K and this really took a lot out of me.   On the bigger climb, I did a few short walking breaks of only a few seconds, but it did seem to help.   I never really lost any ground on the athlete that was in front of me who just kept running.   The turn-around point was at about 10.5K and after that, it was supposed to be a lot easier, as it was mostly downhill from there.   As it turns out, I progressively felt worse as the run went on.   The downhills were pounding the legs, and every type of incline was making me more and more fatigued.    I figured after seeing some of the athletes coming back from the turn-around, I had a decent chance of getting on the podium if I can just keep the legs moving, so I was definitely motivated.

I was keeping the nutrition up by taking in a gel every 5K or so.  In addition, I was taking in salt every 20-25 minutes.   I never really had much more cramping like I did in the first K, just a lot of fatigue.   The last 6K were quite tough, and I just had to keep telling myself to keep moving, as you’ve been doing so well up to this point.   I got passed by another athlete at 17K, but that would be it for the rest of the race.   Once we got back to the top of the hill on Canal road, it was a nice downhill to the 20K marker.   The last K of the race has a pretty tough climb back to Dearhurst, but this is where the crowds were.   Half-way up the hill, I just wanted to take a few quick walking steps to feel better, but the crowd wouldn’t have it.   They yelled for me to dig deep and fire up those quads as there was a runner about 30 meters behind me.  This definitely got me going.  Funny enough though, as I passed, I heard them yelling to that guy to dig in and go after me.   They just wanted to see a battle, but I wasn’t about to give them one.   Since I had no idea if the guy behind me was in AG or not, I just had to give it all I had for the final 600 meters.   So going as deep as I could, I rounded the transition zone and sprinted (all relative at this point) to the finish line to finish the run and the race with a new half iron PB of 4:56:26.

Although I was one of the finalists in the 7 Systems improve more contest, I would have had to do 4:40 in this race to improve upon my previous years time of 5:01.   I knew all along that was not really an option, so my real goal was to podium and take a spot for the Foster Grant 70.3 World Championship in Clearwater, Florida in November.   Mission Accomplished!!   Sweet!

AUGUST UPDATE

With less than a week to go I think I am on track and haven’t had any downtime in my training….thanks to using 7 SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement!

My only race in August was the Toronto Island Sprint Triathlon, which you can read about in my blog.   I’d say it was a success, despite having a poor swim in my opinion.

In the 3 other weekends available for training this month, I did the following:

August 8th – Biked 114K to a family cottage in Bayfield and followed that up with a 10K run.   The ride was almost entirely into a headwind or crosswind, so that was tough.   In addition, it was super humid and I got rained upon twice.  The 10K run was not fast!

August 22nd – Biked an 83K loop around New Hamburg and followed that up with two loops of 8K around town for a total of 16K worth of running.   Again, VERY humid day.   I took all the hydration I could on the ride (72oz of Infinite), and consumed another 48 oz running as I filled up both my Nathan Speed Belt 2 bottles after the first loop.   When it was all said and done, I lost 6 lbs all while consuming 120 oz of fluid.   Glad I wasn’t doing an Ironman, as I’m sure I would have bonked at some point!   I just find it hard to drink much more than I did!

August 28th/29th – I had planned on another long ride/run on Sunday, but after getting a quick training email from Jasper Blake (a bit of a benefit from being in this contest), I decided to mix it up this weekend.   So on the Saturday, I thought I’d see how quick I could just run 15K.   So, in the middle of the day in hot and humid weather again, I did a 15K run in 1:01:45.  This was a pretty hilly run in windy conditions, so I was pleased with the effort.   Garmin data available here.

In addition to the weekend stuff, I’ve still be getting to the New Hamburg pool 3x week, biking to work (58K round trip) 3x week and doing my Tuesday tempo run (~6K – 9K), and Thursday Intervals (usually 5 x 800m w 200m recovery).   If it works out, I’ll hit the gym for some weights/stretching/hot tub once or twice too!

This routine is similar to last year’s effort where I did 5:01 at the 2009 Muskoka 70.3, but this year, I’ve definitely stepped the swimming up a bit more and have done more mid week running.   I actually have a spreadsheet that has tracked every run I’ve done since 2004.   I’d share it with you, but it’s huge!   Here are some highlights of it though.

Due to more speed work, my average run speed has dropped 5 seconds per K.   This includes all the long runs training for the Around the Bay 30K and Ottawa Marathon this year.   In addition, I am on pace for about 150 runs in 2010, which is 20 more than last year.   Each year I am seeing improvements in training and racing (both running and triathlon) so this in encouraging.   At 37, I have to wonder how much more improvements are left.

I hope this final week prior to Muskoka goes well and that I can have a good race once again. 

JULY UPDATE

I’ve done 2 triathlons since starting on 7SYSTEMS. The first one was the Multisport Canada Belwood Sprint Triathlon (1K swim, 30K bike and 7K run) on July 18th. I had a good race and finished 2nd in my age group and 15th overall out of 400 athletes. Next up was the Muskoka Long Course Triathlon (2K swim, 55K bike and 13K run) on July 25th. This race is generally more competitive, so I actually wasn’t expecting to get on the podium in my age group. To my surprise, I once again had a solid race and managed to finish 4th in my age group and 27th overall in the race out of 350 athletes.

My training generally consists of the following on a weekly basis:

  • 3 swims per week in the pool (around 2500m per session) and if possible, one open water swim;
  • 2 mid week runs. One interval session and one tempo run;
  • 2 gym strength training sessions;
  • 3 bike rides to work. This is my primary bike training that I do. It is about 28.5K each way, so 57K round trip and 170K per week.
  • If I am not racing, I will look to do a long brick type of workout each weekend. A typical workout would be about a 70K ride and 16K run;
  • In addition, a lot of stretching and leg rolling is key to maintaining flexibility and working out any muscle tightness.

It is still early, but so far 7SYSTEMS endurance sports supplement has been working well. I am hoping that it will keep me healthy and injury free, as I continue to train for my goal race.

ABOUT LUKE

I’ve done this race in both 2008 and 2009 and I hope to use the 2010 race to qualify for the 70.3 World Championship down in Clearwater Florida in November.

Read more about Luke, who he is and more details about training and racing since starting to take 7SYSTEMS: http://mytriathlonandtrainingadventures.blogspot.com/